Issue 21
Monday, 04 December 2017
Charles Darwin University
E-news
Associate Professor David Crook (right) conducts barramundi tracking work with research assistant Duncan Buckle
Associate Professor David Crook (right) conducts barramundi tracking work with research assistant Duncan Buckle

Barramundi research takes out prize

Research that could help anglers in their search for the iconic barramundi has landed an award at the NT Recreational Fishing Awards.

Associate Professor David Crook and his team have tracked barramundi movement and behaviour in the Roper River, which has turned up immensely contrasting results depending on the individual tagged fish.

“No wonder it’s hard to work out what barra are doing and how to catch them,” Dr Crook said.

One tagged fish was detected more than 10,000 times at 28 logging stations over 185km, while another barra was detected more than 44,000 times in one place, and nowhere else.

“Between these extremes are all kinds of movement and behaviour patterns,” he said.

“Since the project began in 2015, barra movements have been tracked by more than 40 automated listening stations.

“The team has recorded more than 2.6 million detections from more than 180 tagged barra, ranging from tiddlers to metre-plus fish.”

The NT Barra Research team won the Research Award. 

The team is a partnership between researchers at CDU, NT Fisheries and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources, working in collaboration with Indigenous rangers.