MOE FAQ

MOE7 Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of the more frequently asked questions around the MOE.

MOE standards for Managed Operating Environment and is the new name for the management of software on your computer.

It replaces what was previously called the Standard Operating Environment (SOE).

The ‘Environment’ is the collective name for the standard software on your PC and consists of Windows 7, plus Microsoft Office and several other basic applications (VPN, Antivirus etc).

In the past, a SOE relied upon the creation and deployment of a standard image over large groups of users with identical hardware and software requirements (everyone got everything regardless of if they needed or wanted it).

However it has been proven time and again that the requirements of all users are not and never will be identical.

The MOE solution was developed to meet the varying needs of all users, while still working within the standards set by our organisation.

  • Stable and Reliable Environment - Standardising on hardware and software means more thorough testing can be performed prior to release.
  • Fault Resolution - The use of remote control tools will assist ITMS Client Services with rapid and efficient diagnosis and resolution of faults.
  • It is anticipated that resolution will occur at the first point of contact i.e. when the call is logged.
  • Software Delivery - ITMS Client services will be able to install tested software on your computer remotely.
  • Software can then be managed to ensure consistency and meet audit requirements.
  • New Re-imaging Technologies - The ability to re-image a system quickly and return it to a functional state therefore minimising the interruption to client workflow, will enable ITMS to be more flexible with our approach to security and functionality.
  • Self Service - Clients will be able to install many software packages as needed without requiring the assistance of ITMS.
  • These packages will be maintained and certified for use by ITMS.

Tiers are a away of breaking down the software applications according to the need for them.

Tier 1 – All CDU common software Tier 1 applications are those that are incorporated into the initial deployment of the MOE to you computer.

These applications are deemed to be essential to all CDU staff in their day to day work and everybody gets them.

Examples of this would be Microsoft Office, Cisco VPN, Internet Explorer to name but a few.

Tier 3 – ITMS Facilitated then User Initiated These applications are software packages that need to be controlled for reasons such as licensing.

ITMS needs to perform operations, behind the scenes, before they will appear on the list of available software that a user is able to install.

Examples of this would be Abode software packages that require a license to operate legally.

Tier 4 – Self Serve These are applications that have no restrictions and appear on the list of available software for all CDU staff.

These can be installed, by you, at anytime and do not require the involvement of ITMS in the installation process. Just go to the Application Catalog and look for the software you want to install.

Example of these are; Apple Quicktime, Audacity, VLC Media Player.

If a Tier 4 software package is identified as being used by a large number of CDU staff, it is likely to be incorporated into the list of Tier 1 applications, so it is installed on all freshly MOE’ed computers from that point onwards, thus saving each staff member the need to install it individually.

A PST file is a file Outlook uses to store emails outside of your e-mail inbox (as it is not part of your Outlook inbox it is not counted as part of your quota) while at the same time still being able to access these emails from within Outlook.

Most staff will probably not have a PST file and will not need to worry about it.

Other staff, that have been having problem with staying under quota, may have set up (or had setup for them) archiving to a PST file.

For PST files that are currently connected to Outlook use the following procedure.

To find out where your PST is located, right click on the PST's icon and select "Properties for". Once the "Archive Folders Properties" window appears, click on the "Advanced" button.

The second line down "Filename:" has the location of the PST file.

Some people may have PST files on their computer that are not currently connected to Outlook, use the following procedure to find these. Open explorer and right click on "Local Disk (C:)" select search. In the file name to search for box type "*.pst" (no quotes).

The asterisk tells the computer to search for "any" filename that has PST as a file extension. Click the "More Advanced Option" and make sure that "Search hidden files and folders" and "search subfolders" is ticked. Click search and Windows will show all PST files on your computers C: drive.

It is now only a matter of copying them to somewhere else, eg. Memory Stick, CD, external hard drive etc. (NB The search may take few minutes to scan your whole hard drive and to copy a PST file Outlook must be closed.)

Some people may have a PST file that Outlook has created for them. This happens when Outlook, trying to be helpful, offers to turn AutoArchiving" on. To check if this is the case for you, follow the instructions below.

If you find that the "AutoArchive" was ticked, follow part 2 of the instructions.

  1. If applicable, disable auto archive.
  2. To make sure that your mail archive doesn’t change after you have backed it up you will need to disable auto archive first.
    1. In Outlook click Tools ->
    2. Options ->
    3. Other->
    4. AutoArchive and remove the tick the box “Run AutoArchive every ... “.
    5. Click on OK
  3. Search the hard drive for other PST files.
    1. Open windows explorer and click on “search” in the main menu bar at the top.
    2. Choose “All files and folders” from the search options. 
    3. Enter “.pst” into the box “All or part of the file name:”
    4. Change “Look in:” to be “Local Hard Drives (C):”
    5. Click on “Search”.

If you find any files, copy them to your H: drive, M: drive or external storage for safe keeping, ensure that you close Outlook before doing so to prevent any issues.

You will need to get help from ITMS after the MOE deployment to look at your mail archive and re-open them within Outlook.

The most common problem with not be able to do anything with a PST file is that Microsoft Outlook is currently using it. Close down Outlook and try again

Before your computer has the MOE installed on it you will need to back your Outlook rules up. To do this in Outlook click on the "Tools" menu and select "Rules and Alerts". In the "Rules and Alert" window click on the options button.

Then click on the "export rules" save the rules to an area that is not being affected by the MOE deployment, such as your H: drive.

Once your computer has the MOE on it reverse the process, but this time select "import rules".

When you first open up Outlook it will say that it is “preparing for 1st use”.  This can take several minutes as it’s setting up a local copy of your mailbox.

The larger the mailbox the longer this process will take, however you should be able to send and receive emails immediately.

Add email signature

Instruction for adding a signature block to Outlook and the form it should take.

To add an additional mailbox into your outlook profile, do as follows:

  • Log off from your computer, and then log back on.
  • Open Outlook, click on "Tools", then go to "Account Settings"
  • Click the "Change" button
  • Click on "More Settings" then click on "Advanced" Tab.
  • Click on "Add" then type in the name of the mailbox eg "Recruitment" then "OK".
  • Select the mailbox you wish to open in this example "Recruitment ……" then click on "OK" button.
  • Click on "OK" then "Next" click on "Finish".
  • Underneath your own mailbox you will see another mailbox in this example - Recruitment.
  • Click on the little "+" to expand the mailbox.

Repeat this process if you have access to more than one Shared mailbox.

To re-open your archive mail file, first you will need to move your archive files out of the location where they were backed up ( whether this be a USB drive or your H: drive or the M: drive ) to a more appropriate location on the computer itself. Leaving the files on a network drive and opening them from there defeats the purpose of backing up and having a PST file as the data from your email account is just shifted to your H: drive or the like and will still be taking up space on the servers.

An ideal location for this is your ‘My Documents’ folder as it is on the C: drive and is no longer linked to your H: drive.
Once the archive file(s) have been moved, in Outlook:

  1. Select ‘File’, then ‘Open’, then choose ‘Outlook Data File’
  2. Locate your PST files where you moved them to, select a file and press ‘OK’.
  3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 if there is more than one PST file.

Internet Explorer (version 7)

  1. In Internet Explorer click on File
  2. From dropdown list select Import and Export (Import and Export Wizard window will appear)
  3. Click on Next
  4. Select Export Favourites
  5. Click Next
  6. From Import/Export Wizard window select folder you want to export
  7. click Next
  8. Select destination where you would like to your favourites exported to. For an example memory sticks, CD/DVD, portable hard drive, H: drive ( not your hard drive). To select use Browse button.
  9. Open dropdown list, select H: drive, change the file name to ‘IE-bookmark.html’ from the default and save ( the file name is changed as it makes it easier to locate the file when restoring bookmarks later).
  10. click Next
  11. Click on Finish.
  12. Your Favourites are saved in destination you have selected. File name: IE-bookmark.html ( assuming you changed the filename from the default).

Firefox bookmarks (version 2) old version

  1. In Mozilla Firefox click on Bookmarks and select Organize Bookmarks ( see top toolbar)
  2. Bookmarks Manager Window will appear.
  3. Click on File ( top left corner)
  4. From dropdown list select Export . Export bookmark file: window will appear.
  5. Select destination where you would like to your bookmarks exported to.
  6. For an example memory sticks, CD/DVD, portable hard drive, H: drive ( not your hard drive).
  7. And saved. File name: bookmarks.html. Your Bookmarks are saved in destination you have selected.

Firefox bookmarks (version 3)

  1. In Mozilla Firefox click on Bookmarks and select Organize Bookmarks ( see top toolbar)
  2. From Firefox Library window click on Import and Backup and select Export HTML
  3. From Export Bookmarks window select destination where you would like to your bookmarks exported to. For an example memory sticks, CD/DVD, portable hard drive, H: drive (not your hard drive).
  4. And saved. File name: bookmarks.html.
  5. Your Bookmarks are saved in destination you have selected.

Chrome bookmarks

  1. In Google Chrome press "Ctrl + Shift + O" keys at the same time. This will open the book mark manager.
  2. Select Organize (see top toolbar)
  3. Select Export bookmarks to HTML file
  4. From Export Bookmarks window select destination where you would like to your bookmarks exported to. For an example memory sticks, CD/DVD, portable hard drive, H: drive (not your hard drive).
  5. Your Bookmarks are saved in destination you have selected.

The process is essentially the same as the one above, however you would choose "Import Favourites" and browse to the location the favourites were previously saved and then import them.

Restoring Favorites (Bookmarks) into web browser

Internet Explorer

  1. Within Internet explorer, click the file menu and “Import and Export”
  2. Click next
  3. Click “Import favourites” and click next
  4. Select the location that contains your favourites and click next
  5. Click finish.

Firefox

  1. Click “import and Backup” button
  2. Selecting the “Restore” option
  3. Select “Choose File…” option

Chrome

  1. Open the Bookmark manager by pressing "Ctrl + Shift O" at the same time
  2. Select the "Organize" dropdown box
  3. Click “Import bookmarks from HTML file"
  4. Navigate to where you bookmarks are saved.
  5. Click on the “Open" button

Admin accounts will not be automatically be placed on the computers.

You will need to call ITMS and have it put back, as you will need to supply a username.

ITMS will check your computer against a list we have of computers that had admin accounts.

If your computer is not on the list, we will then check the "Application for Admin Access" forms for your original application.

If we find your computer in either of these two places we will put it back.

If we can find no previous record that you had Admin access, you will need to apply for it.

To start off you have NOT lost anything. But to understand what has happened you need to understand what was previously happening.

The old the computer setup (SOE) used to copy down the contents of your Desktop and My Document from the H drive every time you logged in and uploaded them back to the H drive when you logged off.

For a lot of people this process took a long time and people used to complain about it.

This meant that whenever you went to any computer at CDU, the desktop and my document were the same. With the new MOE this connection between the Desktop, My Documents and the H drive has been switched off. Which now allows rapid logging in and logging off.

If you check your H drive you will find a folder called "Desktop" this is the sever copy of what was on both the old SOE computer and the server.

With this disconnect, staff need to be aware when saving anything to My Documents or Desktop they are saving it to that computer and it will not be accessible on any other computer.

See Answer above

The easiest solution to this is to physically swap the monitors over.

That is to swap the left and right monitor.

This can easily be done by turning off your computer and swapping the cables from the monitors, where they enter you computer, then turning on your computer again.

While it is possible to do this in the software settings, if the MOE is put on your computer again this would need to be repeated.

Swapping them permanently fixes this problem.

Most printers are scripted to be added automatically when you logon.

Printers that remain absent can be dealt with as below.

If you feel that this printer should be added automatically please contact the ITMS Service Desk and let them know the name of the printer and the names of the people that should get this printer when they logon, so that this can be updated.

To re-add a printer

  1. Click the Start button
  2. Run
  3. Type in ‘\\swallow\’ (Win XP Casuarina) or "\\shoveler\' (Win7 Casuarina) or "\\hardhead\" (Win7 Alice Springs) or "\\osprey\" (Win7 Palmerston) or "\\cormorant\" (Win7 Katherine)
  4. Locate the printer you normally use, right click on it and select ‘Connect’

To set the default printer

  1. Click the Start button
  2. Printers and Faxes
  3. Select the printer you want as default
  4. Right click and select ‘Set as Default Printer’

ITMS

Contact information

W: logit.cdu.edu.au

Location
IT Kiosk, Red 1, Casuarina campus
Office hours: 8am - 4pm, Mon- Fri (CST)

Telephone
08 8946 6600 (ext 6600)
Phone hours: 7:30am - 6pm (Mon - Thu)
7.30am - 5.30pm (Fri)

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