Cyclone

cyclone icon

Tropical cyclone advice

The Bureau of Meteorology issues a tropical cyclone warning whenever a tropical cyclone is expected to cause winds in excess of 62 km/h (gale force) over land in Australia*.

  • A tropical cyclone advice may be a watch or a warning, depending on when and where the gales are expected to develop.
  • Always monitor and obtain up to date information on any weather event through the Bureau of Meteorology. For information on emergencies tune to your ABC Local Radio channel.

When is tropical cyclone advice issued?

  • A tropical cyclone watch is issued for coastal communities when the onset of gale force winds is expected within 48 hours, but not within 24 hours.
  • A tropical cyclone warning is issued for coastal communities when the onset of gale force winds is expected within 24 hours, or are already occurring.

Impact on University activities

  • A tropical cyclone watch or warning that affects a campus or centre does not automatically mean that the campus or centre is closed. Staff are still expected to attend work unless the Vice-Chancellor (or delegate) declares a “closure” to a campus or centre.

Communications Protocol

Action

Email

CDU SMS

Staff- Register in "eCentre"

Residents- Register with Accommodation Management

CDU website

Tropical Cyclone Watch

Staff in all areas should check their Cyclone Management Plan and begin preparations in readiness for the possibility of the status being upgraded to a tropical cyclone warning.
Read more about Cyclone Preparation Procedures (PDF 242KB).

An “All staff” email will advise that one or more University campuses/centres are affected by a tropical cyclone watch.Not used at this point.

No changes to the CDU website.

Staff and students should monitor the Bureau of Meteorology website for updated information.

Tropical Cyclone Warning

Staff in all areas should complete the actions on their Cyclone Management Plan.

An “All staff” email will advise that one or more University Campuses/Centres are affected by a tropical cyclone warning.

Residents on effected campus will be notified by accommodation management.

Not used at this point.

No changes to the CDU website.

Staff and students should monitor the Bureau of Meteorology website for updated information.

Campus closure

An “All-staff” email will advise that the University is closing one or more campuses or centres due to a tropical cyclone.

Residents on effected campus will be notified by accommodation management.

An SMS will be sent to staff to advise that one or more campuses are closed due to a tropical cyclone.The CDU website will be updated to include details of the campuses or centres closure.
Campus reopening

An “All-staff” email will advise details of the re-opening of campuses or centres.

Residents on affected campus will be notified by accommodation management.

An SMS will be sent to advise staff as to when they may return to work.The CDU website will be updated to include the details of the campuses or centres reopening.

In addition to the actions listed above, the activation of the “closure” or “reopening” responses will also involve the use of additional media, including radio, Facebook, Twitter, and others as appropriate.

Should one or more University campuses or centres be closed, staff and students should monitor the above listed channels for updates and advice as to when they will reopen.

Shelter in a cyclone

Emergency services advise that if your home has been built according to the approved Building Code requirements for cyclones, then you should shelter in place. However, each individual and family must decide whether they will shelter in place, leave the area or seek shelter in a publicly provided shelter.

You should think about this, make a plan, get an emergency and evacuation kit ready, and know where your nearest shelters are, prior to cyclone season each year.

Further information on what to do before during and after a cyclone can be found through your local emergency services website. 

Storm surge

When a tropical cyclone moves across or near the coast, it can cause sea levels to rise higher than the normal tide levels.

This is called a storm surge and is the result of the strong onshore winds and/or reduced atmospheric pressure. Storm surge may also be formed by intense low-pressure systems.

The peak storm surge level does not necessarily occur as the cyclone crosses the coast but could be reached up to several hours prior to landfall. A cyclone does not need to cross the coast for a storm surge to affect low lying areas on the coast.

Breaking waves on top of the surge act like a giant bulldozer, sweeping everything in its path. However the worst impacts occur when the storm surge arrives on top of a high tide. Worldwide, storm surges have been responsible for the major proportion of loss of life associated with cyclones.

People who live in low lying coastal areas need to be aware of storm surge dangers and be prepared to evacuate to higher ground when advised by the counter disaster authorities.

For further information contact your local emergency services.

Further information

*Source: Bureau of Meteorology.