Issue 19
Monday, 06 November 2017
Charles Darwin University
E-news
Honours students Nikki Curtin (left) and Georgia Smith will present their papers at the Bachelor of Psychological Science Honours Research Conference. Photo: Julianne Osborne
Honours students Nikki Curtin (left) and Georgia Smith will present their papers at the Bachelor of Psychological Science Honours Research Conference. Photo: Julianne Osborne

Conference to showcase Honours research

By Ellie Turner

A study into a celebrated Indigenous music collective’s power to influence the social and political movement of reconciliation in Australia will be presented at a research conference this week.

Honours students Nikki Curtin, Georgia Smith and Natina Demetriou will present their papers at the Bachelor of Psychological Science Honours Research Conference at Casuarina campus on Thursday, 9 November.

Nikki said her paper, titled “Singing for freedom”, explored the lyrics of 11 songs performed by the Black Arm Band and interviews from the documentary Murundak: Songs of Freedom.

“The study suggests Indigenous musicians are adopting transformational leadership roles and their pop songs offer pathways for healing and hope,” she said.

Georgia will present her paper, “Predicting Nightmare Distress: The Conflicting Roles of Thought Acceptance and Need for Closure”; and Natina will showcase her research, “Help-seeking Intentions of International Students: The Roles of Attachment, Acculturation, and Stigma”.

At the conference the Australian Psychological Society will present a prize to CDU alumnus Brenna Schroeder to celebrate her achievements, which included publishing a peer-reviewed paper, “Exploring the relationship between personality and bullying; an investigation of parental perceptions”.