Issue 9
Monday, 02 November 2020
Charles Darwin University
E-news
Kenbi Junior Ranger Camp student Jock McKenzie was one of many youngsters who benefited from learning about fire behaviour using augmented ‘4D’ landscapes
Kenbi Junior Ranger Camp student Jock McKenzie was one of many youngsters who benefited from learning about fire behaviour using augmented ‘4D’ landscapes

Technology gives students 4D look at fire

By Carl Pfeiffer

More than 270 school students have gained a greater understanding on the behaviour of bushfires thanks to the use of innovative technology which projects augmented ‘4D’ landscapes.

The technology is being used to demonstrate various fire behaviour simulations as part of an in-school science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) program run by Charles Darwin University undergraduate students.   

In addition to the ‘4D’ simulations, ‘3D’ models were also used to support learning through multi-sensory engagement and play. 

Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods research ICT4 development officer Rohan Fisher provided the simulation models and software run at the workshops. He said the technology provided a hands-on experience for students. 

“We are teaching them about savanna fire ecology, fire behaviour and fire management,” Mr Fisher said.  

“The ‘4D’ and ‘3D’ technology is a great way for the students to learn and helps engage them in the workshops.” 

Students from Kenbi Junior Ranger Camp, Essington Primary, Nightcliff Middle School, Ludmilla Primary, Alawa Primary and Taminmin College all took part in the program.  

The workshops are supported by the Darwin Centre for Bushfires Research and INSPIRED NT – a program funded jointly by CDU, the Northern Territory and Australian governments to encourage science engagement.