Monday, 12 September 2022
Charles Darwin University
E-news
More than 50 First Nations students from across the NT have gotten a taste for university life as part of the Bidjipidji School Camp Program that ran at Charles Darwin University’s (CDU) Casuarina campus
More than 50 First Nations students from across the NT have gotten a taste for university life as part of the Bidjipidji School Camp Program that ran at Charles Darwin University’s (CDU) Casuarina campus

First Nations school students try their hand at University life

First Nations school students from across the Northern Territory have gotten a taste for university life as part of a school camp program held at Charles Darwin University (CDU).

More than 50 students from across the Territory including the Tiwi Islands, Katherine, Alice Springs, Galiwin'ku, Nhulunbuy, Maningrida and Darwin have travelled to CDU’s Casuarina campus for the Bidjipidji School Camp Program which was held from August 28 to 31.

The program, which is in its second year, provides Territory First Nations students who are in years 10, 11 and 12 with an opportunity to visit CDU and experience what university life is like for themselves. 

The program promotes positive school pathways into further education with students having the opportunity to take part in academic sessions, student panels and a range of cultural activities and planned excursions.

CDU’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor of First Nations Leadership and Engagement, Professor Reuben Bolt said the program provides an important opportunity for First Nations students to learn about different educational pathways.

“Through the Bidjipidji School Camp Program the Territory’s First Nations students are provided with a fun and engaging program that will show them what university life is like and the options available to them,” Professor Bolt said.

“Students have an opportunity to interact with CDU staff members and gain an understanding of the various courses available and what they need to do in order to be able to study those courses at university.”

This year’s program saw students take part in activities including a HIVE and social work activity from the College of Health and Human Sciences, a robotics activity from the College of Engineering, IT and Environment and the option to participate in trade or creative arts activities.  

“Programs like this are hugely important in encouraging more First Nations school students into exploring higher education options and developing their leadership skills.”