Charles Darwin University
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Home is where the habitat is

By Katie Weiss

Arboriculture lecturer Phil Kenyon demonstrates special chainsaw techniques to create habitat holes from wood Arboriculture lecturer Phil Kenyon demonstrates special chainsaw techniques to create habitat holes from wood

A Charles Darwin University workshop has raised awareness about creating habitat holes for wildlife from cut-down trees and stumps.

The free workshop at Palmerston campus showed participants how discarded wood could be cut safely by a chainsaw to create hollows, roosts and holes.

Arboriculture lecturer and organiser Philip Kenyon said the workshop encouraged participants to think twice before cutting down entire trees in their backyards.

“By turning the trunk into habitat instead of removing it, you could see microbats, frilled neck lizards, possums, parrots, and even kingfishers living there,” he said.

Mr Kenyon said residents could save money by removing hazardous limbs from a tree in their backyards, rather than uprooting an entire tree, if it were safe to do so.

He said the special chainsaw cutting technique could only be administered by skilled operators, for safety reasons.

Demonstrations about how to create habitat for water-dwelling animals by submerging logs and snags into water were also shown at the workshop.

“There are very few hollows around Darwin,” Mr Kenyon said. “This is an area we could immensely improve by raising awareness about habitat creation.”