Issue 9
Monday, 04 November 2019
Charles Darwin University
E-news
CDU’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor Global Strategy and Advancement, Andrew Everett has worked in international education for more than a decade
CDU’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor Global Strategy and Advancement, Andrew Everett has worked in international education for more than a decade

DVC elected to international education board

CDU’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor Global Strategy and Advancement has been elected to the board of the International Education Association of Australia (IEAA).

Andrew Everett is one of eight board members who will oversee the peak body of international education providers.

The IEAA aims to enhance Australia’s reputation as a provider of world-class education. It advocates for the transformative power of international education and highlights education’s positive impacts on local, national and global societies.

Mr Everett began working in international education in 1997 after about 20 years in the corporate sector. This experience includes working with universities, schools, offshore English language training and vocational education providers.

He has also worked at the University of Southern Queensland and the University of Queensland (UQ) before joining CDU.

While International Director at UQ, international student fee revenue increased from $70m a year to more than $320m a year. Since joining CDU, Mr Everett has driven a 29 per cent increase year-on-year in higher education acceptances by international students wanting to come to Darwin.

Mr Everett said his role with the IEAA would enable him to represent the needs of members of IEAA who are located in the Northern Territory and coincided with Education Minister Dan Tehan’s recent recognition of the different challenges institutions in the regions face and the need for government support.

“With education providers in Darwin, Alice Springs and Katherine, the Northern Territory is attracting partner institutions in the USA, Chile and Canada for what might be seen as non-traditional reasons,” Mr Everett said.

“Many of these foreign providers are finding that only a place such as the NT can truly recognise and work collaboratively in complementing the innovations needed for the delivery of education to remote institutions or regions.

“Climates between Alaska and the NT might differ, but the challenges faced in the delivery of education to remote and first people communities is highly comparable,” he said.  

Mr Everett said his appointment would enable him to promote Australia’s capability in these contexts.

“As Australia’s northern most city, and closest city to Asia, I look forward to working with the Association to present all the outstanding strengths of Australian education providers, not just those from the larger capital cities,” he said.