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Menzies stars to shine in new national academy

By Richmond Hodgson

Head of Menzies’ Global and Tropical Health Division Professor Nicholas Anstey is one of three Fellows to represent Menzies in the new academy Head of Menzies’ Global and Tropical Health Division Professor Nicholas Anstey is one of three Fellows to represent Menzies in the new academy

A newly formed national health and medical sciences academy has called on the expertise of three pre-eminent researchers from the Menzies School of Health Research (Menzies).

Recently launched in Canberra by the Minister for Health, the Hon Sussan Ley MP, the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences has been established to promote health and medical research and its translation to enable a healthier community both in Australia and globally.

Recognised for their significant contributions to human health through excellence in medical research, the Fellows representing Menzies are:

Professor Alan Cass, Menzies director,

Professor Anne Chang, head of Child Health Division

Professor Nicholas Anstey, head of Global and Tropical Health Division

Professor Cass said it was a great honour for Menzies to be recognised among Australia’s leading minds in health and medicine.

“We have a strong focus on making a difference through our research,” Professor Cass said. “Being appointed to the academy provides a clear avenue for Menzies to impart our knowledge and to participate in discussions regarding future directions in health and medical research in Australia.

“The academy brings together the nation’s leading minds in health and medicine, and to see such representation from Menzies and Northern Territory-based researchers is a terrific endorsement of the quality and relevance of our work.” 

He said the focus of the Academy on mentoring the next generation of researchers was crucial. 

“For Australia’s health and medical science to continue to be world-leading, we need to have a strong research base for future generations,” he said.

The Academy serves three broad purposes outlined as high priorities in the recent McKeon report on Health and Medical Research: mentoring the next generation of clinician researchers; providing independent advice to government and others on issues relating to evidence-based medical practice and medical research; and providing a forum for discussion on progress of medical research with an emphasis on translation of research into practice.