Issue 7
Monday, 03 September 2018
Charles Darwin University
E-news
Menzies' chief investigator, Professor Gail Garvey, said the funding would enable critical issues around cancer prevention and early detection, improved diagnosis and treatment to be addressed
Menzies' chief investigator, Professor Gail Garvey, said the funding would enable critical issues around cancer prevention and early detection, improved diagnosis and treatment to be addressed

NHMRC funding success for Menzies

A $2.5 million Menzies School of Health Research-led research collaboration, which includes two Menzies clinician researchers, has been successful in the latest round of National Health and Medical Research Council funding applications.

Funding for the Centre for Research Excellence (CRE) in Targeted Approaches to Improve Cancer Services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, together with fellowships for Professor Anne Chang and Associate Professor Josh Davis were announced recently.

CRE’s chief investigator, Professor Gail Garvey, said the funding would enable the team to address critical issues around cancer prevention and early detection, improved diagnosis and treatment, and the provision of  appropriate care to enhance psychosocial wellbeing of Indigenous Australians affected by cancer.

“Our vision is to improve cancer outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their communities,” Professor Garvey said.

“The collaborative Indigenous-led CRE will contribute to achieving this vision by translating research findings into clinical practice, ensuring knowledge leads to improvements in cancer care for Indigenous people and building research capacity through training the next generation of Indigenous research leaders.”

The new CRE, due to commence in January 2019, will be led by Menzies in collaboration with the Victorian Cytology Service, University of New South Wales, University of South Australia, University of Sydney and Genesis Cancer Care.

Professor Chang, who is paediatric respiratory specialist and division leader of the Menzies Child Health research team, will use her fellowship to continue her work in improving children’s lung health.

Associate Professor Davis, an infectious disease specialist, will use his Career Development Fellowship to undertake a program of research focusing on three themes, namely Staphylococcus aureus infections, prosthetic joint infections and severe sepsis.