Issue 1
Monday, 15 February 2016
Charles Darwin University
E-news
Myrtle rust has arrived in the NT. Image: QLD Government Department of Agriculture and Fisheries
Myrtle rust has arrived in the NT. Image: QLD Government Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

Myrtle rust workshop gets to root of problem

A workshop aiming to address growing concerns about a fungal disease that could devastate certain Top End plants has been hosted by Charles Darwin University lecturers.

More than 70 people attended the day-long workshop on myrtle rust, which can cause shoot death, branch defoliation, deformed leaves, dieback and plant death in susceptible species left untreated over time.

Australasian Plant Conservation president Bob Makinson gave a presentation at the workshop, which focused on recognition, reporting, risk assessment and management options for myrtle rust.

Myrtle rust was first detected in the Darwin region and Tiwi Islands last year and could affect more than 200 native species. Backyard plants, including white apple trees, lilly pillies, tea trees, paperbarks and certain eucalypts, are at risk along with other plants of the Myrtaceae family.

The workshop was jointly hosted and sponsored by CDU’s Conservation Land Management and Horticulture teams.