CDU events

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The language of money in Aboriginal Australia

The language of money in Aboriginal Australia


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Presenter:  Dr Michael Walsh, Honorary Associate, Department of Linguistics, University of Sydney; Senior Research Fellow, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS); Visiting Fellow, ANU; Research Affiliate, CoEDL

Date: Apr 09, 2018

Time: 2:00pm to 3:00pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 6854
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open To the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract: Each Australian Language has needed to adapt to new situations: introduced animals (e.g. camels, cows, horses (Walsh 1992) etc.); introduced machines (e.g. bicycles, cars, trucks, windmills etc); introduced names (Walsh 2016). This paper explores ways in which money is referred to, not just individual words but also discourse patterns.

Reference
Walsh, Michael 1992 A Nagging Problem in Australian Lexical History. In Tom Dutton, Malcolm Ross and Darrell Tryon (eds.) The Language Game: Papers in Memory of Donald C. Laycock (Canberra: Pacific Linguistics), 507-19.
Walsh, Michael 2016 Introduced personal names for Australian Aborigines: adaptations to an exotic anthroponymy. In Laura Kostanski and Guy Puzey (eds) People, Places, Perceptions and Power, 32-46. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

About Dr Michael Walsh: Dr Michael Walsh holds a PhD in Linguistics and has been dedicated to working with Australian Aboriginal languages for about 45 years. He has worked and published extensively on documenting and revitalizing Aboriginal languages of Australia, especially in the Northern Territory and New South Wales. His research interests include lexical semantics, cross-cultural pragmatics, language and identity, language and law, linguistic geography, language revitalization, song language and other expressive uses of language. In addition to his linguistic research, Michael has a strong record of advising and supporting Aboriginal communities in legal matters, such as land rights. He held positions at several Australian universities and research institutions and is currently affiliated with AIATSIS, the University of Sydney and the Australian National University among others. Read Dr Michael Walsh’s profile HERE.

RSVP by Friday, 06 April 2018 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

This event is co-hosted by the Top End Linguistic Circle

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Exploring remote ‘Territory’ to understand gambling in Indigenous communities - An update on the NT Gambling Project

Exploring remote ‘Territory’ to understand gambling in Indigenous communities - An update on the NT Gambling Project


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Presenter:  Ms Charlotte Boyer, Senior Research Officer, Centre for Gambling Research, AUN & Dr Matthew Stevens, Senior Research Fellow – Addictive Behaviours, Menzies School of Health Research

Date: Apr 24, 2018

Time: 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 6854
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  Open To the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract: There is limited research available on gambling in remote Indigenous communities. The Centre for Gambling Research (CGR) is undertaking a project in the Northern Territory to build context and understanding of gambling in three remote Indigenous communities. This seminar will present qualitative and quantitative baseline data on gambling in these communities collected through semi-structured interviews, participatory research and surveys in late 2017. The baseline research was undertaken as a precursor to health promotion activities being implemented in each community by Amity Community Services Inc.. These health promotion activities are currently being implemented and aim to reduce the harm associated with gambling in communities. The CGR will use this baseline research to evaluate the outputs and outcomes achieved through the establishment of health promotion activities over the next year.

About Charlotte Boyer: Charlotte Boyer is a Senior Research Officer in the Centre for Gambling Research at the ANU Centre for Social Research and Methods. She holds a Master of Politics and Public Policy and Bachelor of International Studies. Charlotte manages the Northern Territory Gambling Project focusing on gambling in remote Indigenous communities. Charlotte is experienced in engaging with complex public policy issues while working for government, universities, international organisations and as a consultant in Australia and overseas.

About Matthew Stevens: Matthew Stevens is a public health researcher and statistician. He has worked as a consultant statistician across a range of disciplines from environmental science to epidemiology. He was the first researcher in Australia to receive an NHMRC Early Career research Fellowship focussing on gambling. He has authored reports and journal articles in the field of social determinants of health with a focus on Northern Territory Aboriginal communities in the areas of gambling, housing, social and emotional wellbeing, natural fluoride and children’s dental caries, tobacco control and indicators of alcohol harms.

RSVP by Monday, 23 April 2018 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

READ MORE ABOUT OUR People. Policy. Place SEMINARS OR SHARE THIS EVENT ON FACEBOOK

 
 
 
 
Pioneer Greek Women in Darwin

Pioneer Greek Women in Darwin


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Presenter:  Associate Professor George Frazis

Date: Apr 27, 2018

Time: 6:30pm to 8:30pm

Contact person:  Associate Professor George Frazis
T: 89466486
E: george.frazis@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Casuarina Campus, RED 7.1.04 (MAL NAIRN)

Target audience:  This event is open for public. Please contact A/ Professor George Frazis on 8946 6486

Stories of Greek pioneer migrant women will be presented in this seminar from the early presence of Hellenes in the Northern Territory. Also, Descendants of the pioneer women will present their views with an emphasis in their contribution to the life in Top End.

Our aim is to reveal their life, hardships and achievements of women, who have helped in the development of the cultural and economic life of the Territory. 

How these women have contributed to the economic, political and social development of the Territory. What were their innovative ideas they introduced to Australia? Did they succeed or no? Are there any particular reasons of Greek women choosing to move to Darwin and not to another place, and vice versa?

PDF icon Pioneer Greek Women in Darwin invitation
 
 
 
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HDR Research Enhancement Program

HDR Research Enhancement Program


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Presenter:  Various presenters

Date: Apr 30, 2018 to May 04, 2018

Time: 9:00am to 6:00pm

Contact person:  Fiona Quintner
T: 0889477460
E: fiona.quintner@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Various locations at the Casuarina campus

Target audience:  Current HDR students, supervisors and academics

The Research Enhancement Program provides a range of research-based workshops designed to enhance the careers and learning of Higher Degree by Research (HDR) Students, HDR Supervisors and Research Staff across the University. This program is coordinated by the Office of Research and Innovation. For more details: http://www.cdu.edu.au/research/ori/research-enhancement-program

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Directions

Parking around venues is often limited and we recommend that you arrive early. While every effort is made to ensure vehicle accessibility, there is limited disabled parking near some lecture venues.

Please go to campuses and centres for maps of our campuses.