Native Nation (re)Building: From Economics to Community Building


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Presenter:  Dr. April D.J. Petillo, Assistant Professor of American Ethnic Studies, Native American/Indigenous Studies Emphasis Kansas State University, USA

Date: Aug 03, 2017

Time: 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Lecture Theatre 15.1.01, CDU Alice Springs Campus

Target audience:  Open to the Public - All Welcome – Please Share

Abstract
Native Nation Building theory, as developed by The Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and defined by the University of Arizona and Udall Public Policy Foundation's Native Nations Institute, refers to the efforts Native and Indigenous nations make to increase their capacities for self-governance and self-determined, sustainable community and economic development. Originally conceived as an economic theory to explain why some US Native Nations are successful in managing their affairs within existing US legal and economic structures while others are not, this idea of rebuilding Native and Indigenous capacities through culturally appropriate and effectively savvy governance institutions resonates as well when addressing social issues. This presentation considers how these theoretical foundations can be applied in social service settings and public policy arenas.  The presentation includes examples of this application in several Indigenous contexts where social issues--more than economic ones--are the central concern.

About Dr. April D.J. Petillo
April D. J. Petillo is an Assistant Professor of American Ethnic Studies, Native American/Indigenous Studies Emphasis, at Kansas State University. Dr. Petillo earned her Ph.D. in American Indian Studies with an emphasis on law and policy at the University of Arizona (2015), where she also completed graduate specialty certificates in Gender, Women’s and Sexuality Studies (2015) and Graduate Teaching (2013) as well as the first in Native Nation Building (2014). Her transdisciplinary, intersectional work examines the connections between contemporary targeted violences and exploitation, colonial conquest logics and legacies, community defined justice, public health issues and the law. Within this space, Dr. Petillo focuses on areas of community resilience and interventions as well as extra-Indigenous accountability. Informed by and prioritizing Indigenous perspectives, the bulk of her research covers two areas. The first is Native Nation Building theory applied across Indigenous experiences and within social service, rather than purely economic, contexts. The second is comparative investigation of targeted recruitment for trafficking. Outside of law and policy, Dr. Petillo also examines the Indigenous hip hop landscape—where hip hop aesthetics meet Indigenous experience and self-determination. Her future scholarship is steeped in transformative autobiographic explorations of identity and Arrivant/Indigenous coalition building in hostile political landscapes. Read her full profile here.

RSVP by Wednesday 02 August 2017 via Outlook or thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Presentation can be viewed online via WebEx on request

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