Public lecture: Maluku, its socio-cultural context as an archipelago community


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Presenter:  Professor Dr Aholiab Watloly, S.Pak. M.Hum. Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Pattimura University, Ambon, Indonesia

Date: Oct 10, 2019

Time: 1:00pm to 2:00pm

Contact person:  Dr Vannessa Hearman
T: 08 8946 7044
E: vannessa.hearman@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Savanna Room, Yellow 1.2.48, Charles Darwin University (Casuarina Campus)

Abstract
Maluku is a region of Indonesia that represents an archipelago community, a maritime region surrounded by thousands of islands. The oceans and land form a whole and systemic unity of the cosmos, where the sea acts as a link. The sea shapes the ecology, history, economics, socio-cultural, and politics of the islands of Maluku. This natural bond between the islands characterize Maluku as a socio-geographic unit that is in synergy with one another, forming a unified system. It forms the perspective, way of life and ways of being or the mode of existence of each community among the islands.
The dominance of the sea affects life on the land in terms of ecological diversity, community, culture, religion, family- and exchange system, history, development and other areas of life. The sea becomes a liaison space for the social and to build a mutually supporting, pattern of horizontal relations across the islands. The communities live, develop, and defend themselves as inhabitants of small islands on a social basis, founded on the uniqueness of the geography and the diversity of ecology. For that reason, Maluku is called the “Region of Thousand Islands”, and across the pluralistic and polyethnic community, exists a system of identity melding and crossing as reflected in the concept of “Orang Basudara/Family”. 

RSVP: Register through Eventbrite 

Organised by Indonesian Studies, College of Indigenous Futures, Arts and Society, Charles Darwin University

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