SHARED DECISION MAKING IN INDIGENOUS HEALTH IN SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA


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Presenter:  Dr Gary Groot, Ms Tamara Waldron and Ms Tania Lafontaine

Date: Nov 01, 2017

Time: 9:00am to 10:30am

Contact person:  Pawinee Yuhun
T: 08 8946 7465
E: pawinee.yuhun@cdu.edu.au

Location:  CDU Casuarina Campus, Building Yellow 1, Level 2, Room 48

Target audience:  All audiences welcome.

The Evaluation and Knowledge Impact Team at the Northern Institute would like to invite you to a presentation to be held on Wednesday 1st November 2017.

SHARED DECISION MAKING IN INDIGENOUS HEALTH IN SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA

Supporting Saskatchewan’s Indigenous peoples in making optimal patient-centred health decisions: the development and assessment of realist program theory.

Shared decision-making (SDM) is a process whereby clinicians and patients relate to and influence each other to make healthcare choices that are informed by best evidence and by what matters to the patient.  Our research team has used realist research methods to explore how SDM works (and does not) in a Canadian Indigenous context.  This presentation will 1) describe our development of a realist SDM program theory, and 2) outline how we tested and refined the SDM program theory in an Indigenous context.

Theory development was undertaken through a realist synthesis. The synthesis offers insight into the complexity of SDM. It highlights several interconnected key mechanisms that describe how SDM works and for whom that can be applied across a range of contexts.

To test and refine the program theory, we conducted further synthesis of the literature on Indigenous health and decision making, implemented a realist analysis of interviews with Indigenous patients with cancer, and used sharing circle methodology to ask Indigenous patients and families about their healthcare decision experiences. This refinement considers the macro-context of colonial policies and the role that mechanisms such as ‘trust’ and ‘worldview’ play in healthcare decisions of Indigenous people

This presentation will describe the work undertaken to date and out plans for the next stages of the research. The intent is to provide health system and Indigenous leaders as well as policy makers with the theory required to inform future programs and interventions targeted at supporting SK’s Indigenous peoples in making their optimal patient-centered decisions.

About the presenters:

Dr. Gary Groot is a clinician-scientist and Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health and Epidemiology at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada. Partnering with the First Nations and Métis Health Services and Aboriginal Health Council of the Saskatoon Health Region in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, Dr. Groot has applied a realist lens to the health care decision experiences of Saskatchewan’s Indigenous people. Dr. Groot is currently developing the first realist methodology course at the University of Saskatchewan.

Tamara Waldron, a Master’s student in Community and Population Health at the University of Saskatchewan, has a background in Cell Biology and Psychology. Tamara has undertaken multiple realist syntheses, beginning with her thesis work of developing a program theory for SDM, depicting key mechanisms for successful implementation of this intervention.

Tania Lafontaine is a consultant with the First Nations and Metis Health Services in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. She also is an Indigenous researcher with Dr. Gary Groot, working on a variety of projects for the team. Tania specialises in ensuring cultural safety and competency is achieved, provides a training stage when necessary and brings strong ties to Saskatchewan’s Indigenous community.

*No cost to attend. Light refreshments for morning tea provided at 10.30AM.

RSVP by Tuesday 31st October 2017. For video link and administrative enquiries or to RSVP, please contact:

Pawinee Yuhun
Research Associate
NORTHERN INSTITUTE
P: +61 8 8946 7465
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