Students trace Top End rainfall line

12-Jul-2016

CDU environmental science students from left: Robin Lungeli-Magar, Razib Ahmed and Arashdeep Kaur Sandhu. Photo: Carla Eisemberg

CDU environmental science students from left: Robin Lungeli-Magar, Razib Ahmed and Arashdeep Kaur Sandhu. Photo: Carla Eisemberg


Environmental science students from across the country and overseas have travelled 450 km along the Top End’s rainfall gradient to boost their field skills.

The nine Charles Darwin University students made scientific observations at sites along the sub-continental rainfall gradient during the 10-day field intensive between Darwin and Mataranka.

Professor of Environmental Science Lindsay Hutley said the students explored the impact of fire on vegetation structure and function at the sites, which shared the same rainfall patterns.

Professor Hutley said students gained skills in vegetation and bird surveying, and in the assessment of landscape and soil condition. 

“The field intensive has provided students with the opportunity to develop essential field study skills, and to experience the unique environment of the Top End,” he said. 

Students travelled by four-wheel drive and bus along the gradient to the Douglas Daly and Adelaide River regions, Batchelor, Litchfield National Park and other areas.

The undergraduate and post-graduate students attending the trip were enrolled in the unit, “Ecosystem Function: Field Studies in North Australia”.

The School of Environment also will run a two-week field intensive in Brazil in November, where students will observe Giant South American Turtles that live in the Amazon River.

For more information, visit W: cdu.edu.au/environment/intensives

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