8th Vincent Lingiari Memorial Lecture 2007

Charles Darwin University hosted the 8th Vincent Lingiari Memorial Lecture on Saturday 11 August at Casuarina Campus with key speakers The Honourable Fred Chaney AO and Associate Professor Sue Stanton.

Marking 40 years since the Referendum, the 2007 lecture was titled 40 years since the Referendum: Learning from the past, walking into the future, and was a discussion of current Indigenous-related issues and events.

About the key speakers

The Honourable Fred Chaney AO

The Honourable Fred Chaney AO is the Co-Chair of Reconciliation Australia. He was born in Perth in 1941 and practiced law in New Guinea and Western Australia.

He was involved in the Aboriginal Legal Service in a voluntary capacity in the early 1970s before entering the Senate in 1974. He was Leader of the Opposition in the Senate from 1983 to 1990 and was Member for Pearce in the House of Representatives from 1990 to 1993. His ministerial appointments included Aboriginal Affairs, Social Security, and Minister Assisting the Minister for National Development and Energy.

After leaving parliament he undertook research into Aboriginal affairs policy and administration as a research fellow with the Graduate School of Management at the University of Western Australia from 1993 to April 1995.

He was appointed part-time member of the National Native Title Tribunal in 1994, full-time member in April 1995, and Deputy President in April 2000.

In February 1995 he was appointed Chancellor of Murdoch University and in January 1997 was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia.

Associate Professor Sue Stanton

Sue Stanton is Kungarakan-Gurindji born in Larrakia country, Darwin, Northern Territory. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (History) from the Northern Territory University (now Charles Darwin University) in 1995 and completed an MA (American Indian Studies: Law and Policy - International Indigenous Human Rights Law) from the University of Arizona in 1997.

Prior to her appointment as Associate Professor, School of History and Politics, Faculty of Arts, University of Wollongong (2005), Sue was Head of the Aboriginal Centre at Wollongong. She completed a political internship at the Australian National University in 1995 while working in the office of the Hon. Margaret Reynolds, Australian Parliament, Canberra.

Sue was granted a Fulbright Scholarship in 1995 and undertook postgraduate studies in the USA. Before completing her MA in American Indian Studies, Sue participated in a number of programs in the States, including the Minority Leaders Fellowship Program in Washington DC, and completed the academic component of that program, Study of race and poverty in urban USA, at South Western University in Washington DC in 1995. She also completed two internships in Washington DC as part of this program – one with the National Urban Coalition (urban coalition advocacy and education group for inner city minority groups); and in the Office of Rev. Jesse Jackson at the National Rainbow Coalition.

On her return to Australia, Sue was a research fellow and later Director at the Centre for Indigenous Natural and Cultural Resource Management, Northern Territory University from 1997 until 2000.