Australian Research Council Discovery Indigenous Programme (IN170100020) Aboriginal cosmology: What this means for women and gender public policy

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Aboriginal or Yolŋu people have been observing geology, cosmology and the weather for millennia but have not had the opportunity to document Yolŋu cosmology of women’s Djurrwirr Yalu ‘science’ knowledge. This research will address this gap and examine what it means for women and gender.

The project aims to examine the nature of Aboriginal or Yolngu cosmology and its meaning for and effect on public policy for women and gender. In the Northeast Arnhem region of Elcho Island at Gawa, the project will identify the Djurrwirr Yalu guiding principles used to enhance the levels of governance and other systems applied to their community, culture, traditional ecological environmental knowledge and skill sets. The anticipated benefits include supporting and retaining established Yolngu Australian researchers in traditional ecological environmental knowledge, and improving Yolngu wellbeing and quality of life. Aboriginal or Yolngu people have been observing geology, cosmology and the weather for millennia but have not had the opportunity to document their Yolngu cosmology of women’s Djurrwirr Yalu (Great Bowerbird Nest) ‘science’ knowledge.

This proposed research will address this gap and examine Yolngu cosmology and what this means for women and gender public policy.

 

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Aims

The proposed research is new and innovative. It will examine Yolŋu cosmology and make a significant contribution to the body of Yolŋu cosmology standpoint knowledge. The research has three main aims:

            • Raise profile of Djurrwirr Yalu cosmology standpoint for traditional ecological environmental knowledge;
            • Build capacity in applied research study undertaken by Yolŋu researchers in higher degree research and as             early career researcher’s; and
            • Identify the link between this ethnography and human geography, its people and connections within                       communities, cultures, environmental interactions and economies (Prober, O’Connor & Walsh, 2011).