Confirmation of Candidature PhD by Research - Cat Street


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Presenter:  Cat Street, PhD Candidate

Date: Jun 20, 2018

Time: 1:00pm to 2:30pm

Contact person:  Eve - Marie Cranmer
T: 08 8946 7289
E: eve-marie.cranmer@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Yellow 1.1.39, Casuaraina Campus, Charles Darwin University

What is the problem represented to be?
Examining the problematisation of Indigenous higher education policy issues in the Northern Territory.

Abstract
This presentation will outline Cat’s proposed PhD research which will explore the evolution of Indigenous higher education policy in the NT.  Although access to higher education for Indigenous students in the NT has improved since Indigenous people were first included within higher education policy in the late 1960s, parity with non-Indigenous student outcomes is yet to be achieved. Through examining how policy issues have been problematised in this space, Cat will aim to understand why, despite decades of well-meaning policy initiatives, Indigenous student higher education outcomes in the NT are still not at parity with those of non-Indigenous higher education students. Particular attention will be paid to definitions of ‘success’ within policy frameworks and how this informs the policy cycle.

Bio
Cat Street began her career as a physiotherapist. After completing a Master of Public Health by research in Bangladesh, she then transitioned into the public health space. She worked for the Northern Territory (NT) Department of Health in a health promotion planning and evaluation capacity building role in remote NT communities for three years. Her next roles were with Charles Darwin University conducting research and evaluation in the Indigenous higher education setting. Although Cat currently works in housing policy for the Northern Territory Government, her fascination with educational theory and policy processes have led her to enrol in a PhD program examining the history of Indigenous higher education policy in the NT. Her areas of interest include systems thinking, complexity theory, and poststructuralism.