Economic Evaluation Workshops

Economic evaluation has been identified as a capacity gap in the Northern Territory evaluation community.  As a step towards addressing that gap, the Evaluation and Knowledge Impact team at the Northern Institute are pleased to offer two one day seminars conducted by international experts in November 2016. Registration is available for single days, but the two seminars are designed to be complementary.

 

WORKSHOP 1: Introduction to Economic Evaluation for Policy

Date:          Thursday 24th November 2016

Time:          9.30 am – 4.30 pm. (Registration from 9.15 am)

Venue:        Charles Darwin University, Casuarina campus, Northern Institute, Building Yellow 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Across a range of sectors, governments call for ‘evidence-based policy’, ‘evidence-based programs’ and (in health) ‘evidence-based medicine’.  Usually, ‘evidence based’ refers to evidence of effectiveness; does an intervention or programme work?  However, policy makers and service managers simultaneously want assurances that new and existing treatments or ways of providing services are affordable and cost-effective. 

But what does cost-effectiveness actually mean?  And how do you assess it?

This workshop will:

  • Introduce several core methods of economic evaluation – cost-effectiveness analysis cost-utility analysis and cost-benefit analysis
  • Explain some of the key economic concepts which underpin economic evaluation methods – opportunity cost, incremental analysis, utility, discounting.
  • Describe the basic principles for assessing the resource use and cost of an intervention and its consequences
  • Provide an overview of the need for and methods of decision modelling as a basis for economic evaluation.
  • Introduce Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) and related outcomes which underpin cost-utility analysis in the health sector
  • Give participants the necessary knowledge and confidence to read, understand and critically appraise a published economic evaluation in their own field of policy.
  • Indicate some of the specific challenges of doing economic evaluations of different types of intervention

In a part of the afternoon, a ‘hands-on’ workshop will put the participants in the shoes of the decision-maker.  Using health sector examples, and given specific information about the costs and effectiveness of a range of treatments for different diseases, participants will estimate which choices maximise the health gained in their population.

Economic evaluation, at least as it is conducted in health care, is more a highly specialised branch of evaluation than it is a sub-field of economics. It has some necessary jargon and central concepts, but not much at all; you need neither advanced mathematics nor any grasp of economic theory in order to understand the fundamentals of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis.

As well as opportunities to ask questions in each session there will be additional time put aside at the end of the day for a Q&A session, both to clarify and consolidate the ideas and methods previously covered, but also to enable the participants to ask questions in relation to their own projects, settings and areas of practice or policy.

About the presenter

Rob AndersonRob Anderson is a health researcher and economic evaluator with over 20 years of experience evaluating health services and health programmes.  He is Associate Professor of Health Economics and Evaluation at the University of Exeter Medical School in Exeter, England.  Since 2005, he has worked mainly as a health economist and economic evaluator of drugs, medical devices and public health programmes – both to feed into national policy making (health technology assessments for the National Institute of Health Care Excellence) and to evaluate specific public health interventions (e.g. depression prevention interventions in schools, traffic calming for road injury prevention).  Prior to 2005, he worked as a researcher at the Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Technology, Sydney; there he conducted economic evaluations of genetic screening, shared care for hepatitis C, and the Australian National Cervical Screening Programme. He has a particular interest in using programme theory to better explain the cost-effectiveness, as well as the effectiveness, of complex health programmes.

Cost (GST inclusive):

 

Students

CDU Staff

AES Members

Others

Full day workshop

$55.00

$170

$250

$320

Full day registration includes morning and afternoon tea, and a light lunch.

register here

For program enquiries please contact:

Gill Westhorp
Professorial Research Fellow
NORTHERN INSTITUTE
P: +61 (0)418 388 224

For registration/administrative enquiries please contact:

Pawinee Yuhun
Research Associate
NORTHERN INSTITUTE
P: +61 8 8946 7465
 

WORKSHOP 2: Using Economic Methods Evaluatively

Date:          Friday 25 November 2016

Time:          9.30 am – 4.30 pm. (Registration from 9.15 am)

Venue:        Charles Darwin University, Casuarina campus, Northern Institute, Building Yellow 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Determining whether policies and programs provide value for the resources invested is a tricky business. In the last few decades Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) and related methods such as Social CBA and Social Return on Investment have come into widespread use to weigh the net value of public policies, taking into account both resources used and their consequences. 

However, there is no universal definition of what "value for money" (VFM) means and a range of views about how it should be evaluated. Evaluation and economics share an interest in determining how well resources are used, but the two disciplines tend to approach evaluation in distinct ways, as complementary or sometimes competing disciplines. 

The first half day of this workshop will unpack how to: 

  • define VFM from an evaluative perspective 
  • pose an evaluative question about VFM
  • use evaluative reasoning as the overarching procedure to guide VFM evaluation 
  • select appropriate methods (including but not limited to economic methods depending on context) 
  • make evaluative judgements 
  • determine and justify when evaluation-specific approaches may be preferable to economic analysis alone. 

In the afternoon, a ‘hands-on’ workshop will explore this approach working on a practical example.  Participants can register for the morning only or for the full day workshop.

This is not a workshop on economic methods of evaluation - there are already courses on offer on these methods. This is a workshop on how to mix economic and other evidence to reach well-reasoned evaluative judgements about VFM. 

About the presenter

Julian KingJulian King is an independent public policy consultant from Auckland NZ, and an Honorary Fellow at both Charles Darwin University and the University of Melbourne. His consulting services include evaluation and economic analysis. He has a Master of Public Policy from Victoria University of Wellington and Bachelor of Science from the University of Auckland. His current PhD research focuses on developing a theoretical foundation for evaluating value for money in social investments.

 

 

 

Cost (GST inclusive):

 

Students

CDU Staff

AES Members

Others

Morning only

$27.50

$85

$125

$160

Full day workshop

$55.00

$170

$250

$320

Morning registration includes morning tea.

Full day registration includes morning and afternoon tea, and a light lunch.


register here

For program enquiries please contact:

Gill Westhorp
Professorial Research Fellow
NORTHERN INSTITUTE
P: +61 (0)418 388 224

 

For registration/administrative enquiries please contact:

Pawinee Yuhun
Research Associate
NORTHERN INSTITUTE
P: +61 8 8946 7465