New ways for old ceremonies: keeping country and kin alive in the digital age (ARC Project)


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Presenter:  Dr Linda Ford, Senior Research Fellow, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University

Date: Sep 29, 2016

Time: 2:30pm to 4:00pm

Contact person:  Northern Institute
T: 08 8946 7468
E: thenortherninstitute@cdu.edu.au

Location:  Northern Institute, Yellow Building 1, Level 2, Room 48 (Savanna Room)

Target audience:  OPEN TO THE PUBLIC - ALL WELCOME

AIMS 
This aim of this research is to develop and implement suitable Indigenous frameworks for the preservation, interpretation and dissemination of recordings of ceremonial performances in the Wagait/Daly region of the Northern Territory of Australia. The focus of the research is a body of recordings documented by early anthropologists and missionaries of the final mortuary ceremonies performed. Dr Ford aim is to preserve and extend the power of this ceremony for the benefit of future generations of Indigenous people and Australia.

BACKGROUND/SIGNIFICANCE
Ceremonial performance is a key process for integrating Indigenous knowledge from many different domains, and a socially powerful site of exchange, transmission and transformation of relationship to country and kin. This research aims to extend the power of this ceremony from the present recordings, and to retrace the first written documented records of anthropologists and Jesuit missionaries from 1891 – 1899 and onward.

ABOUT DR FORD
Dr Linda Ford is Aboriginal and identifies as Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu, from Kurrindju, on the Finniss River, in the Northern Territory and is currently a Senior Research Fellow at Northern Institute at CDU, with whom she has a long association. Her knowledge, expertise and research in working with Indigenous groups is clearly invaluable to the Northern Institute. Dr Ford graduated with her PhD (Education), 2006 from Deakin University. Read Dr Ford’s full profile HERE