People. Policy. Place Seminars

Northern Institute manage a ‘People Policy Place’ (PPP) Seminar Series that has been running successfully since the launch of the Northern Institute in 2010. These seminars are attended by academic staff, university students, NT & local government and non-government organisations, local businesses, Indigenous and industry representatives, and interested members of public.

Our PPP seminars are held in our large meeting room (Savanna Room Yellow 1.2.48) at Northern Institute, CDU Casuarina campus and are generally 30-45mins long followed by a Q&A session with the audience. The seminars can be viewed live via Cisco WebEx if you are unable to attend in person. Seminars are also video recorded and uploaded to our Vimeo channel.

PPP presentations are advertised via our Event Calendar, Facebook & Twitter.

If you would like to present a seminar or would like to recommend someone to present please contact the NI Partnerships Coordinator, Katrina Britnell on telephone 8946 7468 or katrina.britnell@cdu.edu.au. We welcome your suggestions!

Northern Institute also run regular Policy Briefings

 

TITLE & PRESENTER 

DATE

PRESENTATION

EVENT RECORDING

Ben Grimes, Lecturer in Law, Charles Darwin University, Australia

Language, power and representative democracy: To what extent does English language dominance undermine good governance and democracy in the Northern Territory?
The NT is one of the most linguistically diverse places in the world, with nearly 70% of Aboriginal Territorians speaking an Aboriginal language as their primary language. Not only does language serve as an essential tool for clear communication, language use and recognition is a powerful vehicle for social inclusion or exclusion.
This seminar will articulate some of  the ways in which the unconscious and deliberate dominance of English undermines good governance and democracy in the NT. The seminar will use the NT Legislative Assembly’s current standing order restricting the use of non-English languages in Parliament as a case study to illustrate the politics of language in the NT, and the implications of English language dominance in government on speakers of minority languages.
The seminar will briefly canvas approaches to language issues in other contexts, such as the legal system, education and health, together with various approaches taken in other countries to more appropriately reflect the multi-lingual fabric of society. Ultimately, this seminar hopes to solicit concrete ideas about how the NT can better reflect its rich multi-lingual character, and to find persuasive ways of articulating the benefits of pro-actively including non-English languages – particularly in places of power.

LINK to RSVP

02 October 2018

@ 10.30am

Presentation Slides not available 

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Professor Marie Carla D. Adone, University of Cologne, Germany The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia

A Signed Lingua Franca in Bimodal Bilingual Arnhem Land
In this paper Prof Dany discusses the case of an Indigenous alternate signing system that we call Arnhem Land Signed Lingua Franca (henceforth ALSLF) in Adone et al. (2018). This signing system coexists with primary and alternate Indigenous sign languages in Arnhem Land and forms part of a continuum (Adone et al. forthcoming).
In the first part of the paper she takes a close look at the sociolinguistic background of this alternate signing system and argues that it functions as a lingua franca, sharing similarities with various lingua francas found elsewhere in the world. She also argues that it reflects the cultural practices of this bimodal bilingual region. In the second part of the paper Prof. Adone focuses on some key structural features of ALSLF. Finally, she concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings.

11 September 2018

@ 10.30am

Presentation Slides not available 

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Professor Peter Radoll, Dean of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Leadership and Strategy, University of Canberra

Is Canberra the Centre? How do you get the corridors of power to engage with the regions in ways that make sense to Aboriginal people in remote and regional contexts?
Located on the ancient lands of the Ngunnawal People and situated between Sydney and Melbourne, Canberra is the centre of Government power in Australia. What shapes and influences policy isn’t what we all might think. Australia is meant to be a representative democracy, yet the representation is so uneven that significant areas of the population have little voice. So how do we get the corridors of power to engage with remote and very remote communities.

15 August 2018

@ 12.00pm

ASP.15.1.01 - Lecture Theatre, Alice Springs Campus / available on WebEx

Presentation Slides not available 

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Dr Cass Hunter, Indigenous Social-Ecological Researcher, CSIRO

The right information, to the right people, in the right format
Science communication has a long history of relaying technical information to audiences not trained to interpret academic material. Our brains are hardwired to remember visual or sensory information much better than abstract concepts. Creating the right environment for understanding and using science information means key elements must come together before research is actually translated into benefits. Translation of research is about getting the right information, to the right people, and in the right format. Good science communication does not often happen by chance but is based on strategic and selective design. By understanding the need for selective co-designing it means information can be further packaged according to the target audience and communication preference. Defining what is “right” for particular target groups begins with asking them. In this presentation, we focus on research in the Torres Strait that plans to use community and stakeholder input to improve the use and interpretation of environmental data. By working with communities and stakeholders we aim to understand how to go about developing an improved information system as tailored to the priorities and preferences of key target groups.

Dr Leah Talbot, Indigenous Social-Ecological Researcher, CSIRO

Indigenous knowledge and governance in Protected Areas in Australia and Sweden and CSIRO’s Indigenous Futures Initiative
Protected areas across the world are key to biodiversity survival and long term sustainability of the world’s natural and cultural resources. These areas are also home to Indigenous Peoples whose traditional lands often resides within or partly within protected area boundaries. I draw on the findings of two international case-studies, Wet Tropics World Heritage Area and Laponia World Heritage Area. Findings reveal that Indigenous Peoples sovereignty of governance and the nation-state sovereignty, along with shared governance arrangements, are critical to supporting Indigenous knowledge effectively being applied in protected areas. I also show how developing an ‘Empowering Indigenous Lens’ as the research methodology enables Indigenous worldviews, epistemologies, and ontologies to underpin and support such findings to be revealed. In addition, Leah will share with you a little about CSIRO’s Indigenous Futures initiative.

07 August 2018

@ 10.00am

Presentation Slides not available 

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Stephanie von Gavel, Business Development Manager, CSIRO Land & Water

Indigenous Knowledge and Digital Platforms
In partnership with Indigenous communities working on country, the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA – www.ala.org.au) is exploring the role of information management platforms in bridging the boundaries between traditional and contemporary Indigenous knowledge and western science. This presentation will provide an overview of the ALA’s Indigenous Ecological Knowledge (IEK) program of work which aims to recognise the essential nature of a collaborative approach, and to provide tools to enable and empower greater Indigenous participation in biodiversity information management and assessment, and to support other aspirations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people related to ecological or biodiversity knowledge. The presentation will also pose some questions around the role of digital infrastructures or platforms in how Indigenous knowledge is digitally captured, managed, and shared in the “information supply chain”.

30 July 2018

@ 3.30pm

PRESENTATION SLIDES

This event was recorded and uploaded to our VIMEO Channel

Valese Sewell, Assistant Director, Centre of Excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Statistics, Australian Bureau of Statistics

Census of Population and Housing: Understanding the Increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counts, 2006-2016
There were 649,171 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people counted in the 2016 Census. This represented an 18 per cent (100,803 people) increase since the 2011 Census and is comparable to the increase of 21 per cent observed between 2006 and 2011. These increases are greater than can be explained by demographic factors alone (e.g. births over deaths and internal/overseas migration) and have important implications for the interpretation of Census data for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), with the guidance of a specialist advisory group, including a representative from CDU (Dr Andrew Taylor) is currently undertaking analysis on the increase in counts between 2011 and 2016. This work builds on analysis published by the ABS following the 2011 Census as Census of Population and Housing: Understanding the Increase in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counts (ABS cat. no. 2077.0). The analysis focuses on:

  • Changes in the composition of the increase population (e.g. changes in age/sex structures and geographic distribution)
  • Demographic factors of population change (e.g. births, deaths and migration)
  • Changing propensity to identify
  • People for whom Indigenous status is unknown
  • Impact of the increase on selected characteristics such as education attainment, labour force participation and income

This session will consist of an overview of analysis and findings to date presented by the ABS followed by discussion time where attendees will be asked to provide feedback and input on the current approach to this analysis and opportunities for further analysis.

17 July 2018

@ 9.30am

Presentation Slides not available 

VIEW PICS

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Tim Sau, Head of nbn™ local South Australia/Northern Territory for NBN Co

The NBN effect
NBN Co (nbn) was established in 2009 to design, build and operate Australia’s new high-speed, wholesale local access broadband network. Underpinned by a purpose to connect Australia and bridge the digital divide, nbn’s key objective is to ensure all Australians have access to fast broadband as soon as possible, at affordable prices, and at least cost.
With the nbn rollout almost 100% complete across the Northern Territory and scheduled to be complete across Australia by 2020, this is a perfect opportunity to discuss the impact that the nbn has had to date. August 9 2016, was not only Census night but it also marked a point where almost 1 in 3 homes could access the nbn network. NBN Co realised that the Census data would capture a social and economic snapshot of a nation in transition – we had ourselves a control group – those who had been connected to the nbn versus those who had not.
Shortly after the Australian Bureau of Statistics released the final Census results, nbn commissioned economics firm AlphaBeta to conduct the first real-world study of the social and economic impacts of the nbn rollout. The results are evidence that nbn is delivering on its original  purpose to foster productivity and drive economic and social benefits for all Australians.
This seminar will unpack some of the findings from this research, look at how nbn is complementing the evolving digital landscape and discuss some of the exciting work the nbn local team is doing to support regional, rural and remote Australia.

03 July 2018

@ 2.30pm

Presentation Slides not available 

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Penny Szybiak, Director, Planning and Performance, Charles Darwin University/ Student, Master of Public Policy, Northern Institute, CDU

Are Indigenous students adequately represented in unit feedback surveys at CDU?
In a new Indigenous HE funding environment, where program funding is increasingly being linked to the delivery of student outcomes, universities, like Charles Darwin University, will need to broaden the evidence base available to help measure and formulate support programs, to ensure they are delivering the desired outcomes.
Student surveys of their teaching and learning experience are one piece of evidence that could be used in this context. However, Indigenous student’s cohorts are small in comparison the broader university student body, and the extent to which the sub-set of students who most need support to succeed and/or be retained are represented within the survey data.
Therefore, this research aims, via an analysis of CDU MyView data from 2015 to 2017, to understand whether Indigenous students are adequately represented in the survey when whole of University data is being analysed. It also aims to understand if there are enough Indigenous student responses in the survey data to allow for statistically reliable analysis and decision making focused on just the Indigenous student cohort. And finally whether the same can be said for the Indigenous student cohort that is un-successful or not retained through to completion.

25 June 2018

@ 2.00pm

Presentation Slides not available 

VIEW PICS

VIDEO is not available

Tanya Karliychuk, Grants & Research Officer, Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN)

ACCAN Grants - funding available in 2019 from the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network
If you have a project idea for work in the area of telecommunications, the internet, broadcasting and new or emerging communications technologies, come and hear what the ACCAN Grants Program might be able to offer you. The ACCAN Grants Program seeks to enable consumers to navigate the communications market, and to establish a sound body of evidence for representation on behalf of the communications consumer. This seminar will cover the types of projects eligible for funding, amounts available, and what you need to know ahead of the 2019 round opening. We’ll also look at the types of projects which have been funded in the past.

07 June 2018

@ 11.00am

PRESENTATION SLIDES

VIEW PICS

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Dr. Timothy Neale, lfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship & Globalization, Deakin University; Deputy Convener for the Deakin Science and Society Network

Walking together: A decolonial experiment in bushfire management on Dja Dja Wurrung country
Within certain settler colonial nations, indigenous peoples are increasingly becoming present and influential in the management of their ancestral territories, their environments, and their hazards. On the Australian continent, for example, Aboriginal peoples are increasingly involved in the management of bushfire (or ‘wildfire’), an environmental phenomenon which is at once of profound cultural significance to many Aboriginal peoples and a major natural hazard to human life and property, managed by an extensive professional bureaucracy of settler government agencies. Drawing upon a case study of collaborative bushfire management between Dja Dja Wurrung peoples and settler bushfire management agencies on Dja Dja Wurrung country, this paper argues for an understanding of such collaborations as ‘decolonial experiments’. This means paying attention not only to their open-ended character, and how such initiatives materially alter ecologies, politics and the economic position of indigenous peoples, but also how they give rise to new resources and strategies for the creation of other decolonial futures.

31 May 2018

@ 2.30pm

Presentation Slides not available 

VIEW PICS

This event was not recorded

Ms Charlotte Boyer, Senior Research Officer, Centre for Gambling Research, Australian National University

Dr Matthew Steven, Senior Research Fellow – Addictive Behaviours, Menzies School of Health Research

Exploring remote ‘Territory’ to understand gambling in Indigenous communities; an update on the NT Gambling Project
There is limited research available on gambling in remote Indigenous communities. The Centre for Gambling Research (CGR) is undertaking a project in the Northern Territory to build context and understanding of gambling in three remote Indigenous communities. This seminar will present qualitative and quantitative baseline data on gambling in these communities collected through semi-structured interviews, participatory research and surveys in late 2017. The baseline research was undertaken as a precursor to health promotion activities being implemented in each community by Amity Community Services Inc.. These health promotion activities are currently being implemented and aim to reduce the harm associated with gambling in communities. The CGR will use this baseline research to evaluate the outputs and outcomes achieved through the establishment of health promotion activities over the next year.

24 April 2018

@ 2.30pm

Presentation Slides not available 

VIEW PICS

This event was not recorded

Dr Michael Walsh, Honorary Associate, Department of Linguistics, University of Sydney; Senior Research Fellow, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS); Visiting Fellow, ANU; Research Affiliate, CoEDL

The language of money in Aboriginal Australia
Each Australian Language has needed to adapt to new situations: introduced animals (e.g. camels, cows, horses (Walsh 1992) etc.); introduced machines (e.g. bicycles, cars, trucks, windmills etc); introduced names (Walsh 2016). This paper explores ways in which money is referred to, not just individual words but also discourse patterns.

Reference
Walsh, Michael 1992 A Nagging Problem in Australian Lexical History. In Tom Dutton, Malcolm Ross and Darrell Tryon (eds.) The Language Game: Papers in Memory of Donald C. Laycock (Canberra: Pacific Linguistics), 507-19.
Walsh, Michael 2016 Introduced personal names for Australian Aborigines: adaptations to an exotic anthroponymy. In Laura Kostanski and Guy Puzey (eds) People, Places, Perceptions and Power, 32-46. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

09 April 2018

@ 2.00pm

Presentation Slides not available 

VIEW PICS

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Ms Emma C Kettle, Director of Training and Capability, RedR Australia

Civilian deployments into disasters and emergencies
Emma Kettle will introduce the practice of surge deployments and the use of civilian specialists in disaster preparedness and disaster response during rapid onset, protracted and complex emergencies. She will talk about RedR Australia’s role as a Standby Partner to the UN and the mechanism of the DFAT funded Australia Assists Programme. Emma will provide examples of the range of RedR’s work drawing examples from recent emergencies including RedR’s current involvement in the Rohingya emergency in Myanmar and Bangladesh.

28 March 2018

@ 2.30pm

PRESENTATION SLIDES

VIEW PICS

This event was recorded and uploaded to our VIMEO Channel

 

Kamal Melvani, PhD Student, Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University

Farmer’s values drive the rehabilitation of land into forest gardens
The sustainability of forest gardens as a land rehabilitation model in tropical countries depends on farmers’ values for them. Forest gardens are increasing in Sri Lanka because farmers value them. To test this, we interviewed 85 farmers in 9 locations in the Intermediate zone (mean annual rainfall 1750-2500 mm). Interviews were conducted in 2 phases. Phase 1 used semi-structured questions focusing on what and why farmers valued forest gardens. In Phase 2, questions were open-ended and investigated strategies farmers adopted to adapt to rainfall variability, and animal pests. Values elicited were categorised into key themes including utility (food, income, fuelwood, timber, medicine), environmental (soil fertility and moisture), intrinsic (aesthetic, contentment), contingency (tree assets, fuelwood) and bequest. Of all, the most cherished were the utility values - provision of income and food. Farmers appreciated the shade cast by trees, friendly animals that frequented their lands and the salubrious environment. Land was developed not only for profit but also as a legacy bequeathed to their children. Although farmers attributed great value to trees/ long-term crops, they knew that short-term crops (paddy, vegetables) provided food. They were stressed by increasing rainfall variability and animal and insect pests. Farmers adopted many on-farm strategies to adapt to rainfall variability including increasing numbers of tree crops, diversifying short-term crops and changing their cultivation calendar. Long-term crops withstood impacts of animal stress only if they were timber and not fruit trees. Despite multiple stressors, farmers retained forest gardens because of their immense value, which proves that they are sustainable forest models.

06 March 2018

@ 2.30pm

Presentation Slides not available 

VIEW PICS

VIDEO Uploaded after event

Dr Bonny Cumming, Project Officer and Veterinarian, Animal Management in Rural and Remote, Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC)

Them Cheeky Dogs – Challenges and Opportunities in Remote Community Animal Management
Companion animals – historically dog, though increasingly cat populations – are often cited as a concern for remote community residents and visitors alike. Contributing factors include limited access to veterinary services and a wide-spread lack of local government staff with animal management skills or knowledge. This, combined with a relative dearth of peer-reviewed studies examining the physical and mental human health impacts of inadequately managed remote community companion animal populations, results in animal management often falling off the priority list. This presentation will outline some of the challenges that remote local governments and communities face when attempting to implement animal management activities, as well as the many opportunities that exist to improve the status quo.

08 February 2018

@ 2.30pm

PRESENTATION SLIDES

VIEW PICS

This event was recorded and uploaded to our VIMEO Channel

Ms Cat Street, Project Coordinator, Office of the Pro Vice Chancellor – Indigenous Leadership, Charles Darwin University

Review of Indigenous Higher Education Policy in the Northern Territory – Where have we come from and where are we heading?
The Australian Government is constantly investing in higher education reforms. This has included deregulatory reforms that began in the early 1990s and have contributed to a higher education sector in which institutions are now required to demonstrate ‘performance’ and that they are achieving ‘success’. But the term ‘success’ is arbitrary and can mean different things to different people. This is particularly relevant in the Northern Territory (NT), where Indigenous Australians make up approximately one third of the population and often hold worldviews different to those of policy-makers. This presentation will share the findings of a research project that examined Indigenous perspectives of ‘success’ in higher education in the context of an ever-evolving Indigenous higher education policy landscape. The research paid particular attention to historical government higher education policies and the responses of institutions in the NT to these policies. It is a particularly pertinent time to consider lessons from history about ‘what works’ to place the NT in good stead for its future.

23 January 2018

@ 10.30am

PRESENTATION SLIDES

VIEW PICS

This event was recorded and uploaded to our VIMEO Channel

Professor Peter Adey, Professor of Human Geography, Royal Holloway University of London

The Way We Evacuate: the politics of mobility in emergency
In 1965 the modernist writer BS Johnson compiled a collection of works from other poets, novelists and journalists reflecting on their experience of evacuation in Britain during World War Two. John Furse’s entry is one of the most compelling. He expresses evacuation’s multiple meanings in such a way that betray the simple but often unacknowledged assumption: that evacuation is for our protection. Instead, for Furse, evacuation is a kind of mobility that empties out, a movement that is done-to, rather than by someone. Evacuation leaves others, or a space - a vacuum – behind. It discharges the unwanted and abject from within the body or boundary. Evacuation is a withdrawal, a retreat.
The paper sets out a writing project that traces a genealogy of evacuation mobilities. It indicates the assemblages of mobilities, machines, architectures and networks which perform evacuation, as well as the bundles of ideas, discourses and practices which both justify and contest it. Potential case-studies from the Australian context will be explored.

THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES. WE APOLOGISE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED.

THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES. WE APOLOGISE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED.THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES. WE APOLOGISE FOR ANY INCONVENIENCE CAUSED.