“It’s a safe environment for us Indigenous students” – Creating a culturally safe learning space for Indigenous Pre-Tertiary students

lcj 17 over.jpgLisa Hall & Michaela Wilkes

LCJ: Special Edition: Indigenous Pathways and Transitions into Higher Education, 17, pp. 112-122
http://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2015.17.11

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Citation
Hall, L., & Wilkes, M. (2015). “It’s a safe environment for us Indigenous students” – Creating a culturally safe learning space for Indigenous Pre-Tertiary students. Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts [Special Issue: Indigenous Pathways and Transitions into Higher Education], 17, 112-122. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2015.17.11.

 

Abstract

In Australia tertiary enabling or ‘bridging’ programs have been introduced as alternative entry pathways to address the still proportionally low numbers of certain marginal groups accessing and being successful in Higher Education. Included in these marginal groups are Indigenous students. In the mainstream these enabling programs tend to focus on the academic skills required for success at a first year University level. However, one program that has been specifically designed for Indigenous students has recognised that these students benefit from a more holistic approach. The Preparation for Tertiary Success (PTS) program, which is part of the Australian Centre for Indigenous Knowledges and Education (ACIKE) - a partnership between Batchelor Institute and Charles Darwin University – takes a multifaceted approach to enabling education. At the centre of this approach is the knowledge that it has been designed specifically for Indigenous students and is shaped by the concepts of cultural safety, ‘Both Ways’ learning and the cultural interface.

 

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