Reflective narration: Impact of Observing Young children’s use of iPad on Lecturers’ Teaching Approaches in Higher education

lcj 18 coverGretch Geng & Leigh Disney

LCJ: Special Edition: Narrative Inquiry, 18, pp. 80-87
http://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2015.18.08

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Citation
Geng, G., & Disney, L. (2015). Reflective narration: Impact of Observing Young children’s use of iPad on Lecturers’ Teaching Approaches in Higher education. Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts [Special Issue: Narrative Inquiry], 18, 80-87. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2015.18.08.

 

Abstract

People conduct learning for our knowledge, and learning can be undertaken outside learning institutions, between different people among social communities.  Learning can be done not only publicly but also through private and reflection time. Education cannot be conducted within certain hours or certain places. It can happen anytime, with anyone and by any culture.  This paper was based upon the perception and experience of the two high education lecturers in teacher education, made observations of pedagogical practices and philosophies of two young children playing iPad.  Based upon the importance of reflective practice, this paper uses reflective narration to illustrate the influence from observing two young children’s use of iPad on two lecturers’ own teaching approaches in higher education settings. This paper uses the method of narrative inquiries and examples of observations of two children’s playing were demonstrated. This paper provides several future research interests into use of gestural interface technology in teaching strategies, and lecturers in higher education, particularly educators in information technologies and early childhood education will find this paper interesting in their own reflection and therefore improve their own teaching outcomes.

 

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