Online learning and teacher education: The experiences of Indigenous teacher education students

lcj-20-coverAlison Reedy & Heleana Wauchope Gulwa

LCJ: Special Issue: New Connections in Education Research, 20, pp. 40-51
http://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2016.20.04

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Citation
Reedy, A., & Gulwa, H.W. (2016). Online learning and teacher education: The experiences of Indigenous teacher education students . Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts [Special Issue: New Connections in Education Research], 20, 40-51. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2016.20.04.

 

Abstract

Online learning is an integral component of higher education delivery at Charles Darwin University, a regional university located in the Northern Territory, Australia. This paper draws on data obtained through the conversational method of ‘yarning’ (Bessarab & Ng'andu, 2010) with five Indigenous teacher education students about their experiences in online learning at CDU. Analysis of the data revealed their experiences were impacted by issues related to access and mode of study and the advantages of online learning were offset by a sense of isolation when studying fully online. This paper draws from data obtained from a broader Educational Design Research study that explored the experiences of Indigenous higher education students across a range of disciplines and the implications of these experiences for the design of online learning environments. 

 

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