Researching together: Reflections on ethical research in remote Aboriginal communities

LCJ 23 cover

Tessa Benveniste and Lorraine King

LCJ: Special Issue:

Ethical relationships, ethical research in Aboriginal contexts: Perspectives from central Australia, 23, pp. 52-63
https://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2018.23.05

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Citation
Benveniste, T. & King, L. (2018). Researching together: Reflections on ethical research in remote Aboriginal communities. Learning Communities: International Journal of Learning in Social Contexts [Special Issue: Ethical relationships, ethical research in Aboriginal contexts: Perspectives from central Australia], 23, 52-63. DOI: https://doi.org/10.18793/LCJ2018.23.05

 

Abstract

Ethical research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is a complex and delicate space. It often juxtaposes Western views of ethical practice with Indigenous worldviews and values. The lead author’s doctoral research project has focused on the expectations, experiences and outcomes of boarding school for remote Aboriginal students, families and communities. This paper presents a thematic analysis of the reflections of the authors on working together on this research as a non-Indigenous researcher and an Aboriginal Community Researcher. Strategies to implement what the authors and literature describe as ethical practice in remote Aboriginal communities are discussed. Implications for future research and lessons learned through this experience are identified.

 

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