Associate Professor Payi Linda Ford

Ph.D

Principal Research Fellow

Dr Payi Linda Ford is Aboriginal and identifies as Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu, from Kurrindju, on the Finniss River, in the Northern Territory and is currently a Principal Research Fellow at Northern Institute at CDU, with whom she has a long association. Her knowledge, expertise and research in working with Indigenous groups is clearly invaluable to the Northern Institute. Dr Ford graduated with her PhD (Education), 2006 from Deakin University.

Linda understands and is familiar with Indigenous epistemological practices and its application to her research projects. Her knowledge and experience has informed her research practises to include ways of being, knowing and ability to lead and contribute to local, national and international research projects. The Indigenist research methodologies are applied to her research projects ie. Australian Research Council Projects, FRDC Aquaculture project and Plant Biosecurity research project.  

Current projects include 2 ARC's PBCRC 4041, LEBA Grants (Ageing, Telehealth and Language revitalisation), NTG Oral History grant.

Payi has also been educated in mainstream Australian education institution. Payi’s mainstream education has involved a number of schools and universities in various Australian locations. This educational background has given Payi a substantial depth to her understanding of education across both Indigenous and non-Indigenous traditions. Payi has also reached the high point of Western education with a Ph.D. Before joining Northern Institute Payi worked as a senior lecturer with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Unit at the University of Queensland.

As a mother, an academic, a researcher, an educator and a practitioner of Indigenous traditions, Payi Linda Ford possesses a unique and rare experience that she is willing to share with people wishing to enhance their understanding of the Indigenous cross-cultural environment.

Associate Professor Linda Payi Ford's presentation ‘Aminila bit tjan kin-ning wurrkama gu? Are we all working together with a united voice for treaty & truth?’ for the 2019 Dr Charles Perkins AO Memorial Oration (Sydney, 15 October) is available to view at this link: https://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/21278

Research interests

  • Indigenous Knowledge Indigenous Ecological Knowledge
  • Indigenous languages i.e. Mak Mak Marranunggu, Marrithiel, Northern Creole & Aboriginal English
  • Indigenous Women’s Business Indigenous Early Childhood
  • Indigenous Higher Education Post-colonialism
  • Law Indigenous Studies
  • Native Title Aboriginal Land Rights Act (1976)
  • Indigenous Land Management Indigenous Community Development
  • Indigenous Enterprise Development

Current Research Projects

‘Seasonal Fire’ 2007 by Aspro. Linda Ford

‘Seasonal Fire’ 2007 by Aspro Linda Ford

‘Seasonal Fire’
Artist:              Associate Professor Payi Linda Ford
Title & Date:    ‘Seasonal Fire’ 2007
Community:    Batchelor, Litchfield National Park, Wagait & Gurudju Aboriginal Land Trust
Clan:               Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu, Kurrindju, Finniss River Region
Medium:          Acrylic on Belgian Linen

The story of ‘Seasonal Fire’
The artist Payi Linda Ford is a Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu woman from Kurrindju, Finniss River region, south west of Darwin Northern Territory, Australia. Her knowledge of fire use on her country is represented in the Seasonal Fire painting. “Wadi kan ngun pip wa!” Ford (2005 & 2010, p72).
Her painting illustrates the annual fire pattern using acrylic paint on Belgian Linen in 2007, stretched over a pine frame 2.1m by 1.6m. She has used the warm ochre coloured dots to embody the characteristics of the fire’s moodiness embellished in its movement across the savannas down onto the flood plains to meet the salt water of Fog Bay. 
The central white ochre dots denote the fire places of the Mak Mak Marranunggu’s people. The light yellow ochre dotes indicating early seasonal burning along the ridge country. The large dark shades of red and orange ochre dots signify the cooler fires. The large green dots indicate the wet and damp areas underfoot where the vegetation is ready to burn. The darker shades of red ochre dots depict hot slow fires. The smaller red ochre dots are fast spirited fires. The medium red ochre dots depict the heat intensity of the late fires over the lower flood plain country.

This image is owned by Linda Ford. It is illegal to copy or reuse this image without the permission of the artist.

‘Wuda wuwa ngunhggu’’ 2005 by Aspro Linda Ford

‘Seasonal Fire’ 2005 by Aspro Linda Ford

‘Wuda wuwa ngunhggu’
Artist:                 Aspro Payi Linda Ford
Title & Date:       Wuda wuwa ngunggu 2005
Medium:             Acrylic on Belgian Linen
Community:         Batchelor, Litchfield National Park, Wagait & Gurudju Aboriginal Land Trust
Clan:         Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu, Kurrindju, Finniss River Region

The story of ‘Seasonal Fire’
The artist Payi Linda Ford is a Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu from Bachelor, Kurrindju, Finniss River, Wagait region, south west of Darwin Northern Territory, Australia.

Ford has painted the wuda wuwa ngunggu (wet season landscape of her country) applying acrylic on Belgian Linen in 2007 and stretched over a pine frame 2.1m by 1.6m. She has used the dots to exemplify the patterns of the wet or best described as “wuda wuwa ngunggu!”. The ‘wet’ is depicted as integral for the Mak Mak Marranunggu’s physical and spiritual well-being. The cool coloured dots embody the characteristics of water bringing forth life. This is embellished in its colorful movement of greens, black brown and whites as they merge across the finniss River catchment region winding down to the tidal areas.

Payi is knowledgeable about looking for the cues and sign about her country and she looks for these throughout the year and knows when to apply this knowledge for cleansing and renewal practice of growth to nourish and gain sustenance. Tyikim or Aboriginal people have many uses of water. The Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu or Tyikim or Aboriginal techniques for the use water have been passed down through the generations and continue to be practiced today. Water is used for cleaning, sustaining life, warmth, security and protection to manage country, cook food and is important for ritual and ceremonial life of Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu people, from conception ceremonies, birth ceremonies and through to mortuary ceremonies.

Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu knowledge of county is critical in the use of its water resources as the seasonal factors dictate when its wet and when this country ought to be given time to reconstitute itself. Seasonal winds, dry seasons mist, fog and knowledge of the plants, animal habitat and people are all considered when the wet arrives and is given to country to head itself.

This image is owned by Linda Ford. It is illegal to copy or reuse this image without the permission of the artist.

Research Posters

Mak Mak Marranunggu Calendar

Mak Mak Marranunggu Calendar

MAK MAK MARRANUNGGU CALENDAR

by Northern Institute Principal Research Fellow Associate Professor Payi Linda Ford

Australian Research Council This research was funded by the Australian Government through the Australian Research Council.

Thanks to photographers, design and production Mark Ford, Chaz Delacoeur, Anne-Maree Burgoine, and David Murtagh All enquiries Chief Investigator ARC Grant Dr Linda Ford.

THIS CALENDAR IS NOT FOR SALE
This image is owned by Linda Ford. It is illegal to copy or reuse this image without the permission of the artist.

Link to Research Publications

Dr Payi Linda Ford

Contacts

T: +61 8 8946 7203
E: linda.ford@cdu.edu.au

Darwin, NT

CDU Research Webportal