Celebrating CDU Research Week 24-28 August 2020

NI Research Week FB Banner

 

MENU - THURSDAY 27 AUGUST 2020

Professor Gill Westhorp NI Research week10AM
Realist influence in the real world: A case study

Professor Gill Westhorp

REALIST RESEARCH, EVALUATION AND LEARNING INITIATIVE (RREALI)

Abstract
Policy and program evaluation is a form of applied social research. Forgive the play on words, but how it’s applied – that is, how the research is done – can influence how it’s applied – that is, the use that’s made of the findings. This presentation will examine one relatively recent evaluation that seems to have had more use than some. It will argue that at least some of that greater use results from the methodology used – realist evaluation. It will introduce some of the key ideas in realist research, illustrate them using the case example, and then apply a realist lens to think about how and why the evaluation has achieved the use it has. The presentation will end by drawing some broader lessons, not just for evaluation, but for research impact more broadly.

REGISTER via Zoom: https://charlesdarwinuni.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_erGfh5BFQS6ti6V2D-42IA


NI Research Week Deepika Mathur

11AM
What a waste! Where do solar panels go to die?

Dr Deepika Mathur
REGIONAL, ECONOMIC AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT (REWD) RESEARCH TEAM

Abstract
Managing waste from removed solar photovoltaics (PV) is increasingly becoming a global problem with growing number of solar panels reaching their end-of-life stage. We undertook a study to explore reasons for their removal, their subsequent journey as waste and the possibility of recycling them. Through this webinar I would like to discuss some of the findings that indicate that social, economic and political factors are more responsible for generating PV panels waste rather than technical factors.

REGISTER via Zoom: https://charlesdarwinuni.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fTu6UQi8R2GRUlmgXY5tFw


Tracy Woodroffe and Opal Sternbaum NI Research Week1PM
Indigenous Women in Science: A framework for Leadership, Knowledge, Innovation and Complexity

Dr Tracy Woodroffe

CONTEMPORARY INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE AND GOVERNANCE (CIKG) RESEARCH TEAM

Abstract
Indigenous engagement in tertiary education has been a point of contention in Australia for many years and was brought more sharply into focus with the Behrendt Review in 2012. One of the solutions to a lack of parity in participation is the concept of a Dual Academy. A Dual Academy approach to higher education would be one that incorporates both Indigenous and Western knowledge systems equally. Conversations and thinking about Indigenous participation and engagement in Higher Education led to a funding opportunity to coordinate a series of workshops. These workshops, conducted in Darwin, Alice Springs and Galiwin’ku, were attended by many Indigenous women with definite views about links between their own cultural knowledge and Education. The combined knowledge addressed diverse areas of Science ranging from midwifery, educational design to linguistics and drone piloting. In this webinar Dr Tracy Woodroffe gives on overview of the Women in Science project and a list of considerations developed from listening to the Indigenous women participants and their messages.

REGISTER via Zoom: https://charlesdarwinuni.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hLepIPkcRXaL3jZ2IRn8Mw


community-services webpage image2PM
The Territory and Me – a quest to understand migration drivers
Fiona Shalley & Dr Sigurd Dyrting
DEMOGRAPHY AND GROWTH PLANNING (DGP) RESEARCH TEAM

Abstract
Population trends tell us that the Territory is experiencing a long period of population stagnation. This is what we know. What we didn’t know was what was changing in people’s motivations around coming and going. The Demography and Growth Planning team designed an online survey – The Territory and Me – to ask why people came to the Territory, why they stay living in the Territory and why they left the Territory. Over 5000 people participated allowing us to apply a range of statistical techniques to distil the key factors driving Territory migration. In this presentation we will step through the processes of setting up the survey, attracting participation and analysing the responses. The resulting stories will be summarised to illuminate migration behaviours. The full range of results are significant to ongoing strategies to attract and retain population in the Territory, particularly as we face the challenges of recovery after the pandemic period.

REGISTER via Zoom: https://charlesdarwinuni.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_m82_aGa7QMW_1wwiRhk58A