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CDU technical production lecturer wins performing arts award

cdu-lecturer-michael-vernau
CDU Lecturer Michael Vernau (left) controls the sound for a major event at George Brown Amphitheatre in Darwin. He’s been honoured at the recent NT Performing Arts Awards for technical stage production.

A Charles Darwin University (CDU) Lecturer has been honoured with an award for educating people in technical stage production for the performing arts.

CDU VET Lecturer, Technical Production, Michael Vernau, was recently presented with the award at the third annual NT Performing Arts Awards held at the Darwin Entertainment Centre.

Mr Vernau was chosen from a wide range of nominees for the award, which publicly recognises and celebrates the values and achievements of individuals who contribute to the performing arts in the Northern Territory.

At the awards ceremony, Mr Vernau was hailed as “The ‘Mr Miyagi of audio’, who continues to draw on unrivalled skills in lighting and audio. His teaching method is recognised as extremely engaging, and his graduates are sought after in the sector.”

Mr Vernau works as a freelance stage production supervisor in addition to his role as a CDU lecturer for the Certificate IV in Live Production and Technical Services. He said he was honoured by the award.

“It’s great to see many of my former students gaining employment in areas such as sound mixing, lighting, video and more,” Mr Vernau said.

“Last year I was an audio engineer at a gig with The Angels, The Superjesus, Shannon Noll and other artists. I looked around and realised out of 11 operators, 8 were former students of mine, and one of the others used to work for me!”

Mr Vernau said he hopes to make his CDU courses more accessible, especially for students in regional and remote communities.

“I’m looking for ways to package some of the qualifications differently and offer them in places such as Katherine and Tennant Creek, where I know there’s a strong demand for the training,” he said.

The performing arts industry contributes $735 million each year to the Territory’s economy.

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