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Supporting the next generation of female political leaders in the Territory

Supporting the next generation of female political leaders in the Territory
Twelve Territory women are undertaking a Charles Darwin University (CDU) Pathway to Politics for Women course that commences this week.

Twelve talented Territory women are undertaking a Charles Darwin University (CDU) course starting this week to support and accelerate their aspirations to run for politics.

The inaugural cohort of diverse Territory women, from Darwin and Alice Springs, are from across the political spectrum and are participating in the Pathway to Politics Program for Women which commences this Thursday in Darwin.

The non-partisan program, run through CDU’s Northern Institute, aims to change the face of politics by equipping women with the skills, knowledge, confidence, and networks they need to run for elected office and thrive as political leaders.

The program will see participants attend workshops, including speechwriting and media training from industry experts, political campaigning, the role of the public service and ethics for women entering politics.

Assistant Minister for Indigenous Health, NT Senator Malarndirri McCarthy, NT Chief Minister Natasha Fyles, NT Minister Lauren Moss and Leader of the Opposition, Lia Finocchiaro MLA, are among some of the politicians who will be providing input into the program. They will share their insights about their political journey, including making the decision to run, and political leadership.

Program participant Georgie Corrie, 29, of Darwin, aspires to represent the Northern Territory in federal parliament.

Ms Corrie said she is looking forward to meeting NT representatives and developing the skills and knowledge to represent Territorians from a diverse array of backgrounds.

“We have a phenomenal powerhouse of women in politics here in the Territory, and it is an amazing opportunity for us to learn from their experiences,” Ms Corrie said.

“I’m excited to be a part of this inaugural program and build the skills and knowledge to shape a future cabinet with greater female representation.”

CDU College of Indigenous Futures Education and the Arts Dean, Professor Ruth Wallace said the program would equip female leaders with the skills to enter a career in politics in the Northern Territory.

“We’re proud to deliver this dynamic program in the NT, which we know will make a real difference in providing Territory women with a clear pathway to pursue a career in politics and best prepare participants for public office,” Ms Wallace said.

“These Territorians will engage with numerous senior women across government leading the way in politics, to better understand both the challenges and significant opportunities that political life offers.”

NT Minister Lauren Moss said she was honoured to take part in the initiative to inspire the next generation of female political leaders.

“I’m proud to be part of a government in the Territory with a majority female cabinet, but I recognise that this is sadly not the case across most levels of business, civil society and indeed politics,” Minister Moss said.

“Taking part in the Pathways to Politics initiative and sharing my experience will hopefully help women and girls aspire to community leadership positions with confidence.”

The Pathways to Politics Program for Women was initiated through the vision of Carol Schwartz AO, Chair of the Trawalla Foundation, who believes in the value of more female leaders.

Pathways to Politics Program for Women has had a significant impact in advancing female political participation since it launched in 2016, with 21 electoral successes achieved nationally across the political spectrum at local, state, and federal levels of government. Most alums intend to run for elected office in the next 10 years.

The program was developed by the Trawalla Foundation, Women’s Leadership Institute Australia and the University of Melbourne and is delivered in partnership with state and territory-based university partners, the University of Melbourne (UoM), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), University of New South Wales (UNSW) and now Charles Darwin University (CDU).

To learn more head to Pathways to Politics Program for Women.

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