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Stella’s working holiday turned healthy career change

This article appears in: Balance work, life and study, Changing careers, Health, Studying in Australia
stella-nutrition

When the pandemic hit in early 2020, it put a stop to Stella’s working holiday around Australia. But that change in plans led her to postgraduate study in nutrition at CDU and now, Stella calls the Northern Territory home.

Understanding nutrition

After not studying since 2014, Stella wanted a career change. She decided to turn her unexpected extra time in Australia into a chance to study nutrition after witnessing her grandmother’s health struggles back home in Indonesia.

When my maternal grandmother was suffering from Diabetes Type II, there was little help and information from experts regarding diabetic nutrition intake.

“Nutrition is all about food and what we eat on a daily basis. I want to learn more about human nutrition decision-making and processing.” She explains.

The Northern Territory of Australia

stella-northern-territory

Now, Stella’s been here in Darwin, Northern Territory for three years and is loving the opportunity to study and see Australia at her own pace.

For the past three years, the Northern Territory has been my home. I can say with pride that I am a Territorian.

“I enjoyed the laid-back outback lifestyle, the multicultural vibe where locals are extremely welcoming to newcomers, and the tropical climate.” She says.

Balancing study, work and life

As a self-funded student, Stella has learned to work within her visa employment restrictions and balance study, work and life.

Balancing study, work, and life is a difficult task. For the first two weeks of my studies, I was struggling. I just needed time to adjust.

Stella has been able to manage her work and study, as well as exploring her new home when she gets the chance.

Life as a Territorian  

stella-territorian

Stella recommends a mindset shift for new international students to help them adjust to their new life.

Living abroad can be challenging and I would like to encourage new international students to think of Darwin as their second home, as I do. Please come to Darwin to experience the vibrant outback lifestyle and to study!

For now, Stella is working and studying hard, aiming for a career here in Australia in allied health. Beyond that, Stella has her sights set on being an entrepreneur back in Indonesia.

“I would like to start my own entrepreneurial business in my home country, such as a healthy catering service.” She says.

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