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Student Duane Heywood
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Marine debris turned into stunning woven baskets

Using discarded marine debris to hand-craft traditional Groote Eylandt woven baskets was one of the highlights for students taking part in a five-day Charles Darwin University course this week. 

Student Duane Heywood

Marine debris turned into stunning woven baskets

Using discarded marine debris to hand-craft traditional Groote Eylandt woven baskets was one of the highlights for students taking part in a five-day Charles Darwin University course this week. 

A woman holding a small child with another child standing beside her and an old woman sitting in the background

Research shows maternal diets are important for children’s dietary quality

Improving the dietary quality of women and children is essential to reduce all forms of malnutrition. Dietary diversity, a key component of high-quality diets, enables the intake of essential nutrients and promotes adequate health.

Research by Dr Kerstin Zander reveals the key drivers people move south.

Research reveals key drivers for migration south

With the build-up on the way, new research has found that along with the tyranny of distance and high living costs, heat is one of the key drivers moving people from the tropics to Australia’s cooler southern states.

children and adults gather round 3D fire map

Science, sunshine and spear-throwing at Kenbi Rangers Culture Camp

It was bright and early as Inspired NT’s Carla Eisemberg and I threw our camping gear in the car. We were off to Wagait Beach for the 2020 Kenbi Ranger Junior Culture Camp.

Tall Poppy 2020

CDU researcher named NT’s Young Tall Poppy

Charles Darwin University ecologist Dr Carla Eisemberg has won the Northern Territory Young Tall Poppy Science Award for 2020 for her outstanding research that has the potential to influence health and sustainable harvest enterprises in remote communities.

RIEL Adjunct Professor Dr Margaret Friedel.

Ecologist links more weeds to camels

The much maligned buffel grass was not the only weed brought to arid Australia by camel, according to long-term Central Australian ecologist Dr Margaret Friedel.

The savanna glider (Petaurus ariel)

Discovery of new glider species highlights conservation risk

Research by Charles Darwin University has changed what was known about the charismatic nectar-loving sugar glider, finding that they are at more risk than ever, particularly after the recent bushfires devastating south-eastern Australia.

CDU researcher Tom Duncan

Research calls for cultural valuing of Aussie species

Indigenous values should be at the centre of conservation planning and decision making to ensure more equitable environmental and cultural outcomes, according to research by a Charles Darwin University PhD candidate.

Charles Darwin University conservation biologist and lead author Professor Stephen Garnett

Research provides roadmap towards global species list

A roadmap to an agreed list of all the world’s species, from mammals and birds to plants, fungi and microbes, has been created for the first time and could have global impacts for their conservation.